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China's Savings Multiplier

Author

Listed:
  • Mehlum, Halvor

    () (Dept. of Economics, University of Oslo)

  • Torsvik, Ragnar

    () (Norwegian University of Science and Technology)

  • Valente, Simone

    () (Norwegian University of Science and Technology)

Abstract

China's growth is characterized by massive capital accumulation, made possible by high and increasing domestic savings. In this paper we develop a model with the aim of explaining why savings rates have been high and increasing, and we investigate the general equilibrium effects on capital accumulation and growth. We show that increased savings and capital accumulation stimulates further savings and capital accumulation, through an intergenerational distribution effect and an old-age requirement effect. We introduce what we term the savings multiplier, and we discuss why and how the one-child policy, and the dismantling of the cradle-to-grave social benefits provided through the state owned enterprises, have stimulated savings and capital accumulation.

Suggested Citation

  • Mehlum, Halvor & Torsvik, Ragnar & Valente, Simone, 2013. "China's Savings Multiplier," Memorandum 17/2013, Oslo University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:osloec:2013_017
    as

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    File URL: https://www.sv.uio.no/econ/english/research/unpublished-works/working-papers/pdf-files/2013/memo-17-2013.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. repec:eee:inecon:v:108:y:2017:i:c:p:169-190 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Cozzi, Guido & Davenport, Margaret, 2017. "Extrapolative expectations and capital flows during convergence," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 108(C), pages 169-190.
    3. Mehlum, Halvor & Torvik, Ragnar & Valente, Simone, 2016. "The savings multiplier," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 83(C), pages 90-105.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    China; One-child policy; Overlapping generations; Growth; Savings;

    JEL classification:

    • D91 - Microeconomics - - Micro-Based Behavioral Economics - - - Role and Effects of Psychological, Emotional, Social, and Cognitive Factors on Decision Making
    • E21 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Consumption; Saving; Wealth
    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development

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