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The Effects of International Remittances on Poverty and Inequality in Ethiopia

Author

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  • Beyene, Berhe Mekonnen

    () (Dept. of Economics, University of Oslo)

Abstract

The paper studies the effects of international remittances on poverty and inequality in Ethiopia using an urban household survey from 2004. In order to identify the effects of remittances on poverty and inequality, counterfactual consumption in the hypothetical case of no remittance is estimated in a selection corrected estimation framework. Inequality and poverty values in the hypothetical and actual cases are then compared. There is a significant reduction in poverty while inequality does not change. The head count, the poverty gap and the squared poverty gap ratios decreased by 2.5%, 1.1% and 0.6% respectively.

Suggested Citation

  • Beyene, Berhe Mekonnen, 2012. "The Effects of International Remittances on Poverty and Inequality in Ethiopia," Memorandum 13/2012, Oslo University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:osloec:2012_013
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    File URL: https://www.sv.uio.no/econ/english/research/unpublished-works/working-papers/pdf-files/2012/Memo-13-2012.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    remittances; poverty; inequality; Ethiopia;

    JEL classification:

    • F24 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Remittances
    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration

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