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High discount rates: - An artifact caused by poorly framed experiments or a result of people being poor and vulnerable?

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  • Holden, Stein

    () (Centre for Land Tenure Studies, Norwegian University of Life Sciences)

Abstract

This study revisits the issue whether poverty and shocks are associated with high discount rates by using an incentive compatible Multiple Price List approach in a poor rural population in Africa where a substantial share of the population had been affected by drought in the recent rainy season. Randomized treatments included tests for present bias, magnitude effects and time horizon effects. While the study revealed significant present bias, magnitude and time horizon effects, average rates of time preference remained high after correcting for risk aversion. Exposure to drought increased the average rates of time preference by 42-47%.

Suggested Citation

  • Holden, Stein, 2013. "High discount rates: - An artifact caused by poorly framed experiments or a result of people being poor and vulnerable?," CLTS Working Papers 8/13, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Centre for Land Tenure Studies.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:nlsclt:2013_008
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    File URL: http://www.umb.no/statisk/clts/clts/clts_wp08_2013.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Holden, Stein T. & Lunduka, Rodney, 2012. "Input Subsidies, Cash Constraints and Timing of Input Supply:-Experimental Evidence from Malawi," 2012 Conference, August 18-24, 2012, Foz do Iguacu, Brazil 131460, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
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    Cited by:

    1. Awel Y. & Azomahou T.T., 2015. "Risk preference or financial literacy? Behavioural experiment on index insurance demand," MERIT Working Papers 005, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Time preferences; poverty; climatic shocks; risk aversion; artifactual field experiment; Multiple Price List approach; Malawi;

    JEL classification:

    • C93 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Field Experiments
    • D91 - Microeconomics - - Micro-Based Behavioral Economics - - - Role and Effects of Psychological, Emotional, Social, and Cognitive Factors on Decision Making
    • Q54 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Climate; Natural Disasters and their Management; Global Warming

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