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The Future of Health Economics: The Potential of Behavioral and Experimental Economics

Author

Listed:
  • Hansen, Fredrik

    () (Department of Economics, Lund University)

  • Anell, Anders

    () (Department of Business Administration, Lund University)

  • Gerdtham, Ulf-G

    () (Department of Economics, Lund University)

  • Lyttkens, Carl Hampus

    () (Department of Economics, Lund University)

Abstract

The health care systems in the Nordic countries are facing key challenges. While the possibilities and willingness to expand health care resources are limited, the demand for health care are increasing due to continuous development of new medical technologies, changing demographics, increasing income level and greater expectations from patients. Consequently, health care organizations are increasingly required to take economic restrictions into account and there is an urgent need to improve the efficiency in the health care sector. A reasonable question to ask is if health economics of today is prepared and equipped to support in meeting these challenges. This article argues that behavioral and experimental economics are promising fields to consider when closing vital knowledge gaps. The aim of this paper is two-fold: introduce the fields of behavioral and experimental economics, and thereafter identify and characterize health economic issues where these two fields have a particularly promising application potential. We also address the advantages of applying a pluralistic view on health economics. Based on the analysis in this, and similar articles, on the development of health economics, we anticipate a dynamic future of health economics.

Suggested Citation

  • Hansen, Fredrik & Anell, Anders & Gerdtham, Ulf-G & Lyttkens, Carl Hampus, 2013. "The Future of Health Economics: The Potential of Behavioral and Experimental Economics," Working Papers 2013:20, Lund University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:lunewp:2013_020
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. #HEJC papers for August 2013
      by academichealtheconomists in The Academic Health Economists' Blog on 2013-08-01 04:00:48

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Health economics; Behavioral economics; Experimental economics; Pluralism;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • B40 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - Economic Methodology - - - General
    • C90 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - General
    • D03 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Behavioral Microeconomics: Underlying Principles
    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General

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