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The Future of Health Economics: The Potential of Behavioral and Experimental Economics

  • Hansen, Fredrik

    ()

    (Department of Economics, Lund University)

  • Anell, Anders

    ()

    (Department of Business Administration, Lund University)

  • Gerdtham, Ulf-G

    ()

    (Department of Economics, Lund University)

  • Lyttkens, Carl Hampus

    ()

    (Department of Economics, Lund University)

The health care systems in the Nordic countries are facing key challenges. While the possibilities and willingness to expand health care resources are limited, the demand for health care are increasing due to continuous development of new medical technologies, changing demographics, increasing income level and greater expectations from patients. Consequently, health care organizations are increasingly required to take economic restrictions into account and there is an urgent need to improve the efficiency in the health care sector. A reasonable question to ask is if health economics of today is prepared and equipped to support in meeting these challenges. This article argues that behavioral and experimental economics are promising fields to consider when closing vital knowledge gaps. The aim of this paper is two-fold: introduce the fields of behavioral and experimental economics, and thereafter identify and characterize health economic issues where these two fields have a particularly promising application potential. We also address the advantages of applying a pluralistic view on health economics. Based on the analysis in this, and similar articles, on the development of health economics, we anticipate a dynamic future of health economics.

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File URL: http://project.nek.lu.se/publications/workpap/papers/WP13_20.pdf
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Paper provided by Lund University, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 2013:20.

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Length: 41 pages
Date of creation: 24 Jun 2013
Date of revision:
Publication status: Forthcoming as Hansen, Fredrik, Anders Anell, Ulf-G Gerdtham and Carl Hampus Lyttkens, 'The Future of Health Economics: The Potential of Behavioral and Experimental Economics' in Nordic Journal of Health Economics.
Handle: RePEc:hhs:lunewp:2013_020
Contact details of provider: Postal: Department of Economics, School of Economics and Management, Lund University, Box 7082, S-220 07 Lund,Sweden
Phone: +46 +46 222 0000
Fax: +46 +46 2224613
Web page: http://www.nek.lu.se/en

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