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Examination behavior – Gender differences in preferences?

Author

Listed:
  • Nekby, Lena

    () (Department of Economics, Stockholm University)

  • Skogman Thoursie, Peter

    () (IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy)

  • Vahtrik, Lars

    () (Department of Economics, Stockholm University)

Abstract

A unique examination strategy in first year microeconomics courses is used to test for gender differences in preferences in examination behavior. Students have the possibility of attaining a seminar bonus on the final exam for near-perfect seminar attendance and are given two voluntary initial quizzes during the semester. At the final exam, the scores received on initial quizzes can either be accepted as is, or students can attempt to improve their marks by answering similar quiz questions on the exam. Results suggest that female students are more likely to take initial quizzes and receive a seminar bonus but are less likely to re-take quiz-questions on the final exam. These results suggest higher risk aversion among female students relative to male students, behavioral differences with tangible implications in terms of final grades on the course.

Suggested Citation

  • Nekby, Lena & Skogman Thoursie, Peter & Vahtrik, Lars, 2013. "Examination behavior – Gender differences in preferences?," Working Paper Series 2013:1, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:ifauwp:2013_001
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Nekby, Lena & Thoursie, Peter Skogman & Vahtrik, Lars, 2008. "Gender and self-selection into a competitive environment: Are women more overconfident than men?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 100(3), pages 405-407, September.
    2. Nabanita Datta Gupta & Anders Poulsen & Marie Claire Villeval, 2005. "Male and Female Competitive Behavior - Experimental Evidence," Post-Print halshs-00180022, HAL.
    3. Dwyer, Peggy D. & Gilkeson, James H. & List, John A., 2002. "Gender differences in revealed risk taking: evidence from mutual fund investors," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 76(2), pages 151-158, July.
    4. Stanley M. Atkinson & Samantha Boyce Baird & Melissa B. Frye, 2003. "Do Female Mutual Fund Managers Manage Differently?," Journal of Financial Research, Southern Finance Association;Southwestern Finance Association, vol. 26(1), pages 1-18.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Gender; preferences; risk aversion; overconfidence;

    JEL classification:

    • A12 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - Relation of Economics to Other Disciplines
    • A14 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - Sociology of Economics
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination

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