IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/hhs/gunwpe/0501.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Policies for Second Generation Biofuels: Current status and future challenges

Author

Listed:
  • Eggert, Håkan

    () (Department of Economics, School of Business, Economics and Law, Göteborg University)

  • Greaker, Mads

    (Statistics Norway)

  • Potter, Emily

    (Statistics Norway)

Abstract

This report reviews the current status of second generation biofuels. First generation biofuels continue to be substantially subsidized, and this has contributed to the increasing use of such fuel. However, recent studies claim that the future of biofuels lies in second generation biofuels, in particular biochemical ethanol made from cellulose. Thus, in this report we ask the following three questions: How far is second generation biofuels from being a competitive GHG abatement technology? Is it likely that first generation biofuels will bridge the development of second generation biofuels? Should trade policy be used to protect domestic infant second generation biofuels industry from import of low cost first generation biofuels from developing countries?

Suggested Citation

  • Eggert, Håkan & Greaker, Mads & Potter, Emily, 2011. "Policies for Second Generation Biofuels: Current status and future challenges," Working Papers in Economics 501, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:gunwpe:0501
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/2077/25502
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Bronwyn Hall, 2004. "The financing of research and development," Chapters,in: Financial Systems, Corporate Investment in Innovation, and Venture Capital, chapter 2 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    2. Hochman Gal & Sexton Steven E & Zilberman David D, 2008. "The Economics of Biofuel Policy and Biotechnology," Journal of Agricultural & Food Industrial Organization, De Gruyter, vol. 6(2), pages 1-24, December.
    3. Kenneth Arrow, 1962. "Economic Welfare and the Allocation of Resources for Invention," NBER Chapters,in: The Rate and Direction of Inventive Activity: Economic and Social Factors, pages 609-626 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Fischer, Carolyn & Newell, Richard G., 2008. "Environmental and technology policies for climate mitigation," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 55(2), pages 142-162, March.
    5. Greaker Mads & Heggedal Tom-Reiel, 2010. "Lock-In and the Transition to Hydrogen Cars: Should Governments Intervene?," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 10(1), pages 1-30, May.
    6. Gurgel Angelo & Reilly John M & Paltsev Sergey, 2007. "Potential Land Use Implications of a Global Biofuels Industry," Journal of Agricultural & Food Industrial Organization, De Gruyter, vol. 5(2), pages 1-36, December.
    7. Carriquiry, Miguel A. & Du, Xiaodong & Timilsina, Govinda R., 2011. "Second generation biofuels: Economics and policies," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(7), pages 4222-4234, July.
    8. Jaffe, Adam B. & Newell, Richard G. & Stavins, Robert N., 2005. "A tale of two market failures: Technology and environmental policy," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(2-3), pages 164-174, August.
    9. James Bushnell & Carla Peterman & Catherine Wolfram, 2008. "Local Solutions to Global Problems: Climate Change Policies and Regulatory Jurisdiction," Review of Environmental Economics and Policy, Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 2(2), pages 175-193, Summer.
    10. Coyle, William T., 2010. "Next-Generation Biofuels: Near-Term Challenges and Implications for Agriculture," Amber Waves, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, June.
    11. Deepak Rajagopal & Steve Sexton & Gal Hochman & David Zilberman, 2009. "Recent Developments in Renewable Technologies: R&D Investment in Advanced Biofuels," Annual Review of Resource Economics, Annual Reviews, vol. 1(1), pages 621-644, September.
    12. A. M. Spence, 1981. "The Learning Curve and Competition," Bell Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 12(1), pages 49-70, Spring.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Geir H. Bjertnæs, 2013. "Biofuel mandate versus favourable taxation of electric cars. The case of Norway," Discussion Papers 745, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
    2. Mads Greaker & Michael Hoel & Knut Einar Rosendahl, 2014. "Does a Renewable Fuel Standard for Biofuels Reduce Climate Costs?," Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, University of Chicago Press, vol. 1(3), pages 337-363.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Biofuels; cellulosic ethanol; Second-generation; Subsidies; Trade policies;

    JEL classification:

    • Q20 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - General
    • Q40 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - General
    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:hhs:gunwpe:0501. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Marie Andersson). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/naiguse.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.