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Panel Cointegration of Chinese A and B Shares


  • Ahlgren, Niklas

    () (Swedish School of Economics, Department of Finance)

  • Sjö, Bo

    () (Swedish Agency for Development Evaluation)

  • Zhang, Jianhua

    () (Department of Economics, School of Business, Economics and Law, Göteborg University)


In this paper we study market segmentation and information flows in China’s stock markets. By using panel data methods we test for a unit root in the price premium of domestic investors' A shares over foreign investors’ B shares as well as cointegration between the prices of the A and B shares on the Shanghai and Shenzhen stock exchanges. We find that the A-share premia are nonstationary and the A- and B-share prices are not cointegrated up till January 2001. After February 2001, when domestic investors were allowed to trade B shares, the A-share premia become stationary and the A- and B-share prices cointegrated. Our findings suggest that the relaxation of the investment restrictions decreased the information asymmetry betwen the A- and B-share markets in China.

Suggested Citation

  • Ahlgren, Niklas & Sjö, Bo & Zhang, Jianhua, 2008. "Panel Cointegration of Chinese A and B Shares," Working Papers in Economics 300, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:gunwpe:0300

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Gary Gang Tian, 2007. "Are Chinese Stock Markets Increasing Integration With Other Markets In The Greater China Region And Other Major Markets?," Australian Economic Papers, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 46(3), pages 240-253, September.
    2. Dickey, David A & Fuller, Wayne A, 1981. "Likelihood Ratio Statistics for Autoregressive Time Series with a Unit Root," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 49(4), pages 1057-1072, June.
    3. Paul McGuinness, 2002. "Reform in China's 'B' share markets and the shrinking A/B share price differential," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 9(11), pages 705-709.
    4. Wang, Zijun & Kutan, Ali M. & Yang, Jian, 2005. "Information flows within and across sectors in Chinese stock markets," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 45(4-5), pages 767-780, September.
    5. Im, Kyung So & Pesaran, M. Hashem & Shin, Yongcheol, 2003. "Testing for unit roots in heterogeneous panels," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 115(1), pages 53-74, July.
    6. Rolf Larsson & Johan Lyhagen & Mickael Lothgren, 2001. "Likelihood-based cointegration tests in heterogeneous panels," Econometrics Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 4(1), pages 1-41.
    7. Maddala, G S & Wu, Shaowen, 1999. " A Comparative Study of Unit Root Tests with Panel Data and a New Simple Test," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 61(0), pages 631-652, Special I.
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    9. Chakravarty, Sugato & Sarkar, Asani & Wu, Lifan, 1998. "Information asymmetry, market segmentation and the pricing of cross-listed shares: theory and evidence from Chinese A and B shares," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 8(3-4), pages 325-356, December.
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    12. Levin, Andrew & Lin, Chien-Fu & James Chu, Chia-Shang, 2002. "Unit root tests in panel data: asymptotic and finite-sample properties," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 108(1), pages 1-24, May.
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    More about this item


    Chinese A and B shares; Market segmentation; Information flow; Panel unit root and cointegration tests;

    JEL classification:

    • C32 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes; State Space Models
    • G12 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Asset Pricing; Trading Volume; Bond Interest Rates
    • G15 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - International Financial Markets

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