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Bureaucratic Corruption, MNEs and FDI


  • Dahlström, Tobias

    () (Jönköping International Business School (JIBS), Jönköping)

  • Johnson, Andreas

    (Jönköping International Business School (JIBS), Jönköping)


This paper adds to the limited number of studies analysing the relationship between host country corruption and FDI inflows. A model describes the incentives foreign MNEs and host country bureaucrats have for engaging in corruption and shows how corruption increases the MNE costs of operations in the host country. The model predicts that the costs caused by corruption reduce FDI inflows. Regression analysis using panel data finds that host country corruption has a significant negative effect on FDI inflows to developing economies but not for developed economies.

Suggested Citation

  • Dahlström, Tobias & Johnson, Andreas, 2007. "Bureaucratic Corruption, MNEs and FDI," Working Paper Series in Economics and Institutions of Innovation 82, Royal Institute of Technology, CESIS - Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:cesisp:0082

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    3. Katariina Nilsson Hakkala & Pehr-Johan Norbäck & Helena Svaleryd, 2008. "Asymmetric Effects of Corruption on FDI: Evidence from Swedish Multinational Firms," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 90(4), pages 627-642, November.
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    6. Smarzynska, Beata K. & Shang-Jin Wei, 2000. "Corruption and the composition of foreign direct investment - firm-level evidence," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2360, The World Bank.
    7. Paul Brenton & Francesca Di Mauro & Matthias Lücke, 1999. "Economic Integration and FDI: An Empirical Analysis of Foreign Investment in the EU and in Central and Eastern Europe," Empirica, Springer;Austrian Institute for Economic Research;Austrian Economic Association, vol. 26(2), pages 95-121, June.
    8. Shang-Jin Wei, 1997. "Why is Corruption So Much More Taxing Than Tax? Arbitrariness Kills," NBER Working Papers 6255, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Shang-Jin Wei, 2000. "Local Corruption and Global Capital Flows," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 31(2), pages 303-354.
    10. Pranab Bardhan, 1997. "Corruption and Development: A Review of Issues," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 35(3), pages 1320-1346, September.
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    12. Frank Flatters & W. Macleod, 1995. "Administrative corruption and taxation," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 2(3), pages 397-417, October.
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    Cited by:

    1. Karpaty, Patrik & Gustavsson Tingvall, Patrik, 2011. "Offshoring of Services and Corruption: Do Firms Escape Corrupt Countries?," Working Papers 2011:2, Örebro University, School of Business, revised 28 May 2012.
    2. Tingvall, Patrik Gustavsson, 2010. "Offshoring and Corruption: Does Corruption Matter," Working Paper Series in Economics and Institutions of Innovation 237, Royal Institute of Technology, CESIS - Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies.
    3. Roberto Basile & Luigi Benfratello & Davide Castellani, 2005. "Attracting Foreign Direct Investments in Europe: Are Italian Regions Doomed?," Rivista di Politica Economica, SIPI Spa, vol. 95(1), pages 319-319, January-F.
    4. Toure Mamoudou & Cédric Achille Mbeng Mezui, 2017. "Working Paper 271 - Facteurs déterminants des IDE en Afrique," Working Paper Series 2388, African Development Bank.
    5. Dauti, Bardhyl, 2008. "Determinants of Foreign Direct Ivestment inflow in South East European Countries - Panel Estimation," MPRA Paper 18273, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Hawkes, Denise Donna & Yerrabati, Sridevi, 2015. "Institutions and investment in South and East Asia & Pacific region: Evidence from meta-analysis," Economics Discussion Papers 2015-62, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    7. Patrik Karpaty & Patrik Tingvall, 2015. "Service Offshoring and Corruption: Do Firms Escape Corrupt Countries?," Journal of Industry, Competition and Trade, Springer, vol. 15(4), pages 363-381, December.
    8. Turan Subasat & Sotirios Bellos, 2013. "Governance and foreign direct investment in Latin America: A panel gravity model approach," Latin American Journal of Economics-formerly Cuadernos de Economía, Instituto de Economía. Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile., vol. 50(1), pages 107-131, May.
    9. Tingvall, Patrik, 2011. "Dynamic Effects of Corruption on Offshoring," Ratio Working Papers 182, The Ratio Institute.

    More about this item


    corruption; foreign direct investment; multinational enterprises;

    JEL classification:

    • D73 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Bureaucracy; Administrative Processes in Public Organizations; Corruption
    • F21 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Investment; Long-Term Capital Movements
    • F23 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Multinational Firms; International Business

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