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Do individuals with children value the future more?

Author

Listed:
  • Daniel Horn

    (Centre for Economic and Regional Studies and Corvinus University of Budapest)

  • Hubert Kiss Janos

    (Centre for Economic and Regional Studies and Corvinus University of Budapest)

Abstract

In recent years public and political debate suggested that individuals with children value the future more. We attempt to substantiate the debate and using a representative survey we investigate if the number of children (or simply having children) indeed is associated with a higher valuation of the future that we proxy with an aspect of time preferences, patience. We find that in general there is no correlation between having children and patience, though for young women with below-median income we find some weak evidence in line with the conjecture. We also show some evidence that for this subpopulation it is not having children that matters, but marital status. More precisely, young single women are less patient than other young non-single women.

Suggested Citation

  • Daniel Horn & Hubert Kiss Janos, 2020. "Do individuals with children value the future more?," CERS-IE WORKING PAPERS 2010, Institute of Economics, Centre for Economic and Regional Studies.
  • Handle: RePEc:has:discpr:2010
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Children; Patience; Time preferences;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D91 - Microeconomics - - Micro-Based Behavioral Economics - - - Role and Effects of Psychological, Emotional, Social, and Cognitive Factors on Decision Making
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth

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