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Labour Adjustment and Efficiency in Hungary

Author

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  • Gabor Korosi

    () (Institute of Economics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences)

Abstract

Transition from socialist to market economy brought drastic changes to the Hungarian labour market. Employment fell by 1.6 million, i.e., by more than 25% during the early transition period, while unemployment jumped from practically nil to over 14% within four years. The rapid economic growth of the recent years could only create relatively few jobs, even though the unemployment rate continuously declined, and is less than 6% since 2001. This paper describes labour adjustment after the transitional recession, and its relationship to corporate efficiency during the recovery period, based on a panel of medium-sized and large Hungarian firms. Labour demand is also related to firm level productive efficiency.

Suggested Citation

  • Gabor Korosi, 2002. "Labour Adjustment and Efficiency in Hungary," Budapest Working Papers on the Labour Market 0204, Institute of Economics, Centre for Economic and Regional Studies, Hungarian Academy of Sciences.
  • Handle: RePEc:has:bworkp:0204
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    File URL: http://www.econ.core.hu/doc/bwp/bwp/bwp0204.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Gabor Korosi & Laszlo Halpern, 2000. "Efficiency and Market Share in Hungarian Corporate Sector," IEHAS Discussion Papers 0009, Institute of Economics, Centre for Economic and Regional Studies, Hungarian Academy of Sciences.
    2. Irena Grosfeld & Jean-Francois Nivet, 1997. "Firms' Heterogeneity in Transition: Evidence from a Polish Data Set," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 47, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
    3. Faggio, Giulia & Konings, Jozef, 2003. "Job creation, job destruction and employment growth in transition countries in the 90s," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 27(2), pages 129-154, June.
    4. Gabor Kertesi & Janos Kollo, 2000. "Wage Inequality in East-Central Europe," Budapest Working Papers on the Labour Market 0007, Institute of Economics, Centre for Economic and Regional Studies, Hungarian Academy of Sciences.
    5. Bresson, G & Kramarz, F & Sevestre, P, 1992. "Heterogeneous Labor and the Dynamics of Aggregate Labor Demand: Some Estimations Using Panel Data," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 17(1), pages 153-168.
    6. Elena Bardasi & Ana Lasaosa & John Micklewright & Gyula Nagy, 1999. "Measuring the Generosity of Unemployment Benefit Systems: Evidence from Hungary and elsewhere in Central Europe," Budapest Working Papers on the Labour Market 9908, Institute of Economics, Centre for Economic and Regional Studies, Hungarian Academy of Sciences.
    7. John Micklewright & Gyula Nagy, 1999. "The Informational Value of Job Search Data and the Dynamics of Search Behaviour: Evidence from Hungary," Budapest Working Papers on the Labour Market 9901, Institute of Economics, Centre for Economic and Regional Studies, Hungarian Academy of Sciences.
    8. Hamermesh, Daniel S, 1992. "A General Model of Dynamic Labor Demand," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 74(4), pages 733-737, November.
    9. Gyula Nagy & Peter Galasi, 1999. "Outflows from Insured Unemployment in Hungary, 1992-1996," Budapest Working Papers on the Labour Market 9903, Institute of Economics, Centre for Economic and Regional Studies, Hungarian Academy of Sciences.
    10. Gabor Kertesi & Janos Kollo, 2002. "Labour Demand with Heterogeneous Labour Inputs after the Transition in Hungary, 1992-1999 - and the Potential Consequences of the Increase of Minimum Wage in 2001 and 2002," Budapest Working Papers on the Labour Market 0205, Institute of Economics, Centre for Economic and Regional Studies, Hungarian Academy of Sciences.
    11. Manuel Arellano & Stephen Bond, 1991. "Some Tests of Specification for Panel Data: Monte Carlo Evidence and an Application to Employment Equations," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 58(2), pages 277-297.
    12. Micklewright, John & Nagy, Gyula, 1996. "Labour market policy and the unemployed in Hungary," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 40(3-5), pages 819-828, April.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    labour demand; productive efficiency; firm in transition economy;

    JEL classification:

    • J23 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Demand
    • D21 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Firm Behavior: Theory
    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models

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