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Experimental Evidence on Gender Interaction in Lying Behavior

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  • Seeun Jung

    (ESSEC Business School - Essec Business School, THEMA - Théorie économique, modélisation et applications - UCP - Université de Cergy Pontoise - Université Paris-Seine - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

  • Radu Vranceanu

    (THEMA - Théorie économique, modélisation et applications - UCP - Université de Cergy Pontoise - Université Paris-Seine - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, ESSEC - ESSEC Business School - Essec Business School - Economics Department - Essec Business School)

Abstract

The paper reports results from an Ultimatum Game experiment with asymmetric information where Proposers can send to Responders misleading information about their endowment. We allow for all possible gender combinations in the Proposer-Responder pairs. Proposer messages that underestimate the actual amount are quite widespread. The frequency of lying is slightly higher in mixed groups. Conditional on lying, men tend to state bigger lies than women. On the other hand, women tend to tell smaller lies when paired with men, than when paired with women. In general, women present higher acceptance rates than men.

Suggested Citation

  • Seeun Jung & Radu Vranceanu, 2015. "Experimental Evidence on Gender Interaction in Lying Behavior," Working Papers hal-01184964, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:wpaper:hal-01184964
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://hal-essec.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01184964v2
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Gender studies; Ultimatum Game; Asymmetric information; Lies; Extensive vs. intensive margin;

    JEL classification:

    • C72 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Noncooperative Games
    • C91 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Laboratory, Individual Behavior
    • D83 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Search; Learning; Information and Knowledge; Communication; Belief; Unawareness
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination

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