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Trade Elasticities

Author

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  • Jean Imbs

    (PSE - Paris School of Economics - ENPC - École des Ponts ParisTech - ENS Paris - École normale supérieure - Paris - PSL - Université Paris sciences et lettres - UP1 - Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - EHESS - École des hautes études en sciences sociales - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement, PJSE - Paris Jourdan Sciences Economiques - UP1 - Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne - ENS Paris - École normale supérieure - Paris - PSL - Université Paris sciences et lettres - EHESS - École des hautes études en sciences sociales - ENPC - École des Ponts ParisTech - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement)

  • Isabelle Méjean

    (X-DEP-ECO - Département d'Économie de l'École Polytechnique - X - École polytechnique)

Abstract

Conventional aggregate trade elasticity estimates hardly vary across countries. We introduce an aggregate elasticity that is implied by theory: It is the value that equates the welfare gains from trade as implied by one- and multi-sector versions of the model in Arkolakis et al. (American Economic Review, 102 (2012):94–130). These estimates are predicated on sector-level values for trade elasticites, which we provide at three-digit levels for 28 developed and developing countries. The values for this aggregate elasticity vary greatly across countries, and they do so because of countries' patterns of production and because a given sector-level elasticity displays considerable cross-country heterogeneity.

Suggested Citation

  • Jean Imbs & Isabelle Méjean, 2017. "Trade Elasticities," Post-Print halshs-01626805, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:journl:halshs-01626805
    DOI: 10.1111/roie.12270
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/halshs-01626805
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    Cited by:

    1. Simonovska, Ina & Waugh, Michael E., 2014. "The elasticity of trade: Estimates and evidence," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 92(1), pages 34-50.
    2. Harald Oberhofer & Michael Pfaffermayr, 2021. "Estimating the trade and welfare effects of Brexit: A panel data structural gravity model," Canadian Journal of Economics/Revue canadienne d'économique, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 54(1), pages 338-375, February.
    3. Benedikt Heid & Mario Larch & Yoto V. Yotov, 2021. "Estimating the effects of non‐discriminatory trade policies within structural gravity models," Canadian Journal of Economics/Revue canadienne d'économique, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 54(1), pages 376-409, February.
    4. Andrei A Levchenko & Jing Zhang, 2013. "The Global Labor Market Impact of Emerging Giants: A Quantitative Assessment," IMF Economic Review, Palgrave Macmillan;International Monetary Fund, vol. 61(3), pages 479-519, August.
    5. Bergin, Adele & Economides, Philip & Garcia-Rodriguez, Abian & Murphy, Gavin, 2019. "Ireland and Brexit: modelling the impact of deal and no-deal scenarios," Quarterly Economic Commentary: Special Articles, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    6. Agénor, Pierre-Richard & Alper, Koray & Pereira da Silva, Luiz, 2018. "External shocks, financial volatility and reserve requirements in an open economy," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 83(C), pages 23-43.
    7. Soon, Byung Min & Thompson, Wyatt, 2016. "Estimating Import Demand Functions in Major Beef Importing Countries by Bayesian Hierarchical Linear Model," 2016 Annual Meeting, July 31-August 2, Boston, Massachusetts 235735, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    8. Jyrki Ali-Yrkkö & Tero Kuusi, 2020. "Shield the US from Imports! – GDP impacts on Finland and other European Union member states," Finnish Economic Papers, Finnish Economic Association, vol. 29(1), pages 52-80, Spring.
    9. Connell, William & Simons, Wouter & Vandenbussche, Hylke, 2018. "The cost of non-TTIP: A Global Value Chain Approach," CEPR Discussion Papers 12705, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
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