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Differentiated management of GM diffusion in China: Further hampering the self-sufficiency in cereal production?

Author

Listed:
  • Michel Fok

    () (Cirad-CA-UPR 10 Systèmes cotonniers - Systèmes cotonniers en petit paysannat - CA - Département Cultures annuelles - Cirad - Centre de Coopération Internationale en Recherche Agronomique pour le Développement)

  • Weili Liang

    (HEBAU-DA - Department of Agronomy of HEBAU - Hebei Agricultural University)

  • Guiyan Wang

    (HEBAU-DA - Department of Agronomy of HEBAU - Hebei Agricultural University)

  • Yuhong Wu

    (HEBAU-DA - Department of Agronomy of HEBAU - Hebei Agricultural University)

Abstract

China is a big country in terms of biotech achievements. It is also a rare country demonstrating crop-differentiated policies in the dissemination of the GMOs. While the release of GMOs is authorized notably for cotton in 1998, it is still prohibited for food crops. In spite of the positive outcomes on cotton, at least in the short run, and of the persisting decrease of the cereal production, the hesitation to release GMO on food crops should keep on prevailing. This seems to be founded when the qualitative dimension of the food production is taken into consideration.

Suggested Citation

  • Michel Fok & Weili Liang & Guiyan Wang & Yuhong Wu, 2005. "Differentiated management of GM diffusion in China: Further hampering the self-sufficiency in cereal production?," Post-Print halshs-00008939, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:journl:halshs-00008939
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/halshs-00008939
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Kym Anderson, 1987. "On Why Agriculture Declines with Economic Growth," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 1(3), pages 195-207, October.
    2. Huang, Jikun & Hu, Ruifa & Pray, Carl & Qiao, Fangbin & Rozelle, Scott, 2003. "Biotechnology as an alternative to chemical pesticides: a case study of Bt cotton in China," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 29(1), pages 55-67, July.
    3. Pray, Carl & Ma, Danmeng & Huang, Jikun & Qiao, Fangbin, 2001. "Impact of Bt Cotton in China," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 29(5), pages 813-825, May.
    4. Huang, Jikun & Hu, Ruifa & van Meijl, Hans & van Tongeren, Frank W., 2003. "Economic Impacts Of Genetically Modified Crops In China," 2003 Annual Meeting, August 16-22, 2003, Durban, South Africa 25883, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    5. Huang, Jikun & Hu, Ruifa & Rozelle, Scott & Qiao, Fangbin & Pray, Carl E., 2002. "Transgenic varieties and productivity of smallholder cotton farmers in China," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 46(3), pages 1-21.
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    Keywords

    China; GMO; food security; cotton; foodcrops; productivity; biotechnology; Chine; OGM; sécurité alimentaire; coton; cultures vivrières; productivité; biotechnologies;

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