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Impact of Bt Cotton in China

Author

Listed:
  • Pray, Carl
  • Ma, Danmeng
  • Huang, Jikun
  • Qiao, Fangbin

Abstract

A sample of 283 cotton farmers in Northern China was surveyed in December 1999. Farmers that used cotton engineered to produce the Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxin substantially reduced the use of pesticide without reducing the output/ha or quality of cotton. This resulted in substantial economic benefits for small farmers. Consumers did not benefit directly. Farmers obtained the major share of benefits and because of weak intellectual property rights very little went back to government research institutes or foreign firms that developed these varieties. Farmers using Bt cotton reported fewer pesticide poisonings than those using conventional cotton.
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Suggested Citation

  • Pray, Carl & Ma, Danmeng & Huang, Jikun & Qiao, Fangbin, 2001. "Impact of Bt Cotton in China," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 29(5), pages 813-825, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:29:y:2001:i:5:p:813-825
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Giancarlo Moschini & Harvey Lapan, 1997. "Intellectual Property Rights and the Welfare Effects of Agricultural R&D," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 79(4), pages 1229-1242.
    2. Giancarlo Moschini & Harvey Lapan & Andrei Sobolevsky, 2000. "Roundup ready® soybeans and welfare effects in the soybean complex," Agribusiness, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(1), pages 33-55.
    3. Jeffrey Hyde & Marshall A. Martin & Paul V. Preckel & C. Richard Edwards, 1999. "The Economics of Bt Corn: Valuing Protection from the European Corn Borer," Review of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 21(2), pages 442-454.
    4. Jose B. Falck-Zepeda & Greg Traxler & Robert G. Nelson, 2000. "Rent creation and distribution from biotechnology innovations: The case of bt cotton and Herbicide-Tolerant soybeans in 1997," Agribusiness, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(1), pages 21-32.
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • B12 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - History of Economic Thought through 1925 - - - Classical (includes Adam Smith)
    • B31 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - History of Economic Thought: Individuals - - - Individuals
    • D03 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Behavioral Microeconomics: Underlying Principles

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