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Impact of Bt Cotton in China

  • Carl Pray

    (Rutgers University)

  • Danmeng Ma

    (Rutgers University)

  • Jikun Huang

    (Chinese Academy of Sciences)

  • Fangbin Qiao

    (Chinese Academy of Sciences)

A sample of 283 cotton farmers in Northern China was surveyed in December 1999. Farmers that used cotton engineered to produce the Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxin substantially reduced the use of pesticide without reducing the output/ha or quality of cotton. This resulted in substantial economic benefits for small farmers. Consumers did not benefit directly. Farmers obtained the major share of benefits and because of weak intellectual property rights very little went back to government research institutes or foreign firms that developed these varieties. Farmers using Bt cotton reported fewer pesticide poisonings than those using conventional cotton.

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Paper provided by China Economics and Management Academy, Central University of Finance and Economics in its series CEMA Working Papers with number 510.

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Length: 13 pages
Date of creation: 2001
Date of revision:
Publication status: Published in World Development, Volume 29, Issue 5, May 2001, Pages 813-825
Handle: RePEc:cuf:wpaper:510
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://cema.cufe.edu.cn/

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  1. Moschini, GianCarlo & Lapan, Harvey E. & Sobolevsky, Andrei, 2000. "Roundup Ready Soybeans and Welfare Effects in the Soybean Complex," Staff General Research Papers 1799, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  2. Giancarlo Moschini & Harvey Lapan, 1997. "Intellectual Property Rights and the Welfare Effects of Agricultural R&D," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 79(4), pages 1229-1242.
  3. Jose B. Falck-Zepeda & Greg Traxler & Robert G. Nelson, 2000. "Rent creation and distribution from biotechnology innovations: The case of bt cotton and Herbicide-Tolerant soybeans in 1997," Agribusiness, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(1), pages 21-32.
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