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Taxe carbone, une mesure socialement régressive ? Vrais problèmes et faux débats

Listed author(s):
  • Emmanuel Combet

    (CIRED - Centre International de Recherche sur l'Environnement et le Développement - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - ENPC - École des Ponts ParisTech - AgroParisTech - EHESS - École des hautes études en sciences sociales - CIRAD - Centre de Coopération Internationale en Recherche Agronomique pour le Développement)

  • Frédéric Ghersi

    (CIRED - Centre International de Recherche sur l'Environnement et le Développement - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - ENPC - École des Ponts ParisTech - AgroParisTech - EHESS - École des hautes études en sciences sociales - CIRAD - Centre de Coopération Internationale en Recherche Agronomique pour le Développement)

  • Jean Charles Hourcade

    ()

    (CIRED - Centre International de Recherche sur l'Environnement et le Développement - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - ENPC - École des Ponts ParisTech - AgroParisTech - EHESS - École des hautes études en sciences sociales - CIRAD - Centre de Coopération Internationale en Recherche Agronomique pour le Développement)

This paper aims at clearing up misunderstandings about the distributive impacts of carbon taxes, which proved to be a decisive obstacle to their further consideration in public debates. It highlights the gap between partial equilibrium analyses, which are close to the agents' perception of the costs of taxation and general equilibrium analyses, which better capture its ultimate consequences. It shows that the real impact on households' income inequality is not mechanically determined by the initial energy budgets and their flexibilility but also depends upon the recycling modes of the tax revenues and their general equilibrium effects. The comparison of five tax-recycling schemes highlights the existence of trade-offs between maximizing total consumption, maximizing the consumption of the low-income classes and reducing income inequality.

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Paper provided by HAL in its series CIRED Working Papers with number hal-00866409.

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Date of creation: Jan 2009
Handle: RePEc:hal:ciredw:hal-00866409
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References listed on IDEAS
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