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Improving aid effectiveness in aid-dependent countries : lessons from Zambia

Author

Listed:
  • Monica Beuran

    () (CES - Centre d'économie de la Sorbonne - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - UP1 - Université Panthéon-Sorbonne, World Bank - LUNWB)

  • Gaël Raballand

    () (World Bank - LUNWB)

  • Julio Revilla

    () (World Bank - LUNWB)

Abstract

Zambia was a middle-income country when it achieved independence from Great Britain in 1964. After decades of international aid Zambia has become a low-income country, and its per capita GDP is only now returning to the levels it had reached over forty years ago. While aid is far from the only variable at work in Zambia's development, its impact has been questionable. This paper examines the issue of aid effectiveness in Zambia, especially in terms of how the incentive structure faced by donors may lead to decreased accountability and inadequate concern for long-term outcomes, rendering aid less beneficial. The paper concludes by proposing a revised approach to the provision and use of international aid in Zambia, as well as in other aid-dependent countries in Sub-Saharan Africa.

Suggested Citation

  • Monica Beuran & Gaël Raballand & Julio Revilla, 2011. "Improving aid effectiveness in aid-dependent countries : lessons from Zambia," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) halshs-00611901, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:cesptp:halshs-00611901
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/halshs-00611901
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Keywords

    Aid effectiveness; Zambia; donors; projects; aid incentives.; Efficacité de l'aide; Zambie; bailleurs de fonds; projets; motivations de l'aide.;

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