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Monetary transmission and bank lending in Germany

Author

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  • Kakes, Jan
  • Sturm, Jan-Egbert
  • Philipp Maier

    (Groningen University)

Abstract

This paper analyses the role of bank lending in the monetary transmission process in Germany. We follow a sectoral approach by distinguishing corporate lending and household lending. We find that banks respond to a monetary contraction by adjusting their securities holdings, rather than reducing their loans portfolio. Most lending categories even show an increase following a monetary tightening. The main implication of our results is that a bank lending channel is not an important transmission mechanism. On the contrary, by insulating their loans portfolio from monetary shocks, banks are more likely to weaken than to strengthen the impact of monetary policy.

Suggested Citation

  • Kakes, Jan & Sturm, Jan-Egbert & Philipp Maier, 1999. "Monetary transmission and bank lending in Germany," CCSO Working Papers 199906, University of Groningen, CCSO Centre for Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:gro:rugccs:199906
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    File URL: http://irs.ub.rug.nl/ppn/24106323X
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    6. Ben S. Bernanke & Mark Gertler, 1995. "Inside the Black Box: The Credit Channel of Monetary Policy Transmission," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 9(4), pages 27-48, Fall.
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    8. Dale, Spencer & Haldane, Andrew G., 1995. "Interest rates and the channels of monetary transmission: Some sectoral estimates," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 39(9), pages 1611-1626, December.
    9. Kashyap, Anil K & Stein, Jeremy C & Wilcox, David W, 1996. "Monetary Policy and Credit Conditions: Evidence from the Composition of External Finance: Reply," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 86(1), pages 310-314, March.
    10. Garretsen, Harry & Swank, Job, 1998. "The Transmission of Interest Rate Changes and the Role of Bank Balance Sheets: A VAR-Analysis for the Netherlands," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 20(2), pages 325-339, April.
    11. Bruce C. Greenwald & Joseph E. Stiglitz, 1993. "Financial Market Imperfections and Business Cycles," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 108(1), pages 77-114.
    12. Gertler, Mark & Gilchrist, Simon, 1993. " The Role of Credit Market Imperfections in the Monetary Transmission Mechanism: Arguments and Evidence," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 95(1), pages 43-64.
    13. Fernando Barran & Virginie Coudert & Benoît Mojon, 1995. "Transmission de la politique monétaire et crédit bancaire. Une application à trois pays de l'OCDE," Revue Économique, Programme National Persée, vol. 46(2), pages 393-413.
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    Cited by:

    1. Kakes, Jan & Sturm, Jan-Egbert, 2002. "Monetary policy and bank lending:: Evidence from German banking groups," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 26(11), pages 2077-2092, November.
    2. I. Arnold & C.J.M. Kool & K. Raabe, 2005. "New evidence on the firm size effects in US monetary policy transmission," Working Papers 05-11, Utrecht School of Economics.
    3. Ewa Wrobel & Tomasz Lyziak & Jan Przystupa, 2008. "Monetary Policy Transmission in Poland: a Study of the Importance of Interest Rate and Credit Channels," SUERF Studies, SUERF - The European Money and Finance Forum, number 2008/1 edited by Morten Balling.
    4. Stefanos Papadamou & Vaggelis Arvanitis & Costas Siriopoulos, 2014. "A Bank Lending Channel that is Working via Housing or via Consumer Loans? Evidence from Europe," Bulletin of Applied Economics, Risk Market Journals, vol. 1(1), pages 15-34.
    5. Mohd Zaini Abd Karim & Amy Azhar Mohd Harif & Azira Adziz, 2006. "Monetary Policy and Sectoral Bank Lending in Malaysia," Global Economic Review, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(3), pages 303-326.

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