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Do Females Always Generate Small Bubbles? Experimental Evidence from U.S. and China

Author

Listed:
  • Jianxin Wang

    () (School of Business, Central South University)

  • Daniel Houser

    () (Interdisciplinary Center for Economic Science and Department of Economics, George Mason University)

  • Hui Xu

    () (Department of Economics, Beijing Normal University)

Abstract

We report data from double-auction experiments in China and the U.S. using groups of exclusively females, exclusively males and mixed gender participants. We find that female groups in China generate price bubbles statistically identical to those produced by exclusively male groups in both China and the U.S., all of which are significantly larger than the bubbles produced by exclusively female groups in the U.S. Our results suggest that gender differences in financial markets may be sensitive to culture.

Suggested Citation

  • Jianxin Wang & Daniel Houser & Hui Xu, 2017. "Do Females Always Generate Small Bubbles? Experimental Evidence from U.S. and China," Working Papers 1063, George Mason University, Interdisciplinary Center for Economic Science, revised Sep 2017.
  • Handle: RePEc:gms:wpaper:1063
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    Cited by:

    1. Hubert J. Kiss & Laszlo A. Koczy & Agnes Pinter & Balazs R. Sziklai, 2019. "Does risk sorting explain bubbles?," CERS-IE WORKING PAPERS 1905, Institute of Economics, Centre for Economic and Regional Studies.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    gender differences; bubbles; experimental asset markets; culture differences;

    JEL classification:

    • G01 - Financial Economics - - General - - - Financial Crises
    • G11 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Portfolio Choice; Investment Decisions
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • Z13 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Economic Sociology; Economic Anthropology; Language; Social and Economic Stratification

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