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Hidden vs. known gender effects in experimental asset markets

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  • Eckel, Catherine C.
  • Füllbrunn, Sascha C.

Abstract

Eckel and Füllbrunn (2015) report a striking gender effect in experimental asset markets: Markets with only men produce substantial price bubbles while markets with only women sometimes produce negative bubbles. A possible explanation might be that common expectations about the behavior of men and women in a market drive the bubble formation. If we take away these common expectations, male/female differences might be reduced. Hence, we reran this experiment hiding the single-sex composition of the markets. We find no significant difference between all-male and all-female markets, providing evidence that common expectations play a role in bubble formation.

Suggested Citation

  • Eckel, Catherine C. & Füllbrunn, Sascha C., 2017. "Hidden vs. known gender effects in experimental asset markets," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 156(C), pages 7-9.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:156:y:2017:i:c:p:7-9
    DOI: 10.1016/j.econlet.2017.04.009
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Cheung, Stephen L. & Hedegaard, Morten & Palan, Stefan, 2014. "To see is to believe: Common expectations in experimental asset markets," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 66(C), pages 84-96.
    2. Ernan Haruvy & Yaron Lahav & Charles N. Noussair, 2007. "Traders' Expectations in Asset Markets: Experimental Evidence," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 97(5), pages 1901-1920, December.
    3. Cueva, Carlos & Rustichini, Aldo, 2015. "Is financial instability male-driven? Gender and cognitive skills in experimental asset markets," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 119(C), pages 330-344.
    4. Catherine C. Eckel & Philip J. Grossman, 2008. "Forecasting Risk Attitudes: An Experimental Study Using Actual and Forecast Gamble Choices," Monash Economics Working Papers archive-01, Monash University, Department of Economics.
    5. Catherine C. Eckel & Sascha C. Füllbrunn, 2015. "Thar SHE Blows? Gender, Competition, and Bubbles in Experimental Asset Markets," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 105(2), pages 906-920, February.
    6. Smith, Vernon L & Suchanek, Gerry L & Williams, Arlington W, 1988. "Bubbles, Crashes, and Endogenous Expectations in Experimental Spot Asset Markets," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 56(5), pages 1119-1151, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Jianxin Wang & Daniel Houser & Hui Xu, 2017. "Do Females Always Generate Small Bubbles? Experimental Evidence from U.S. and China," Working Papers 1063, George Mason University, Interdisciplinary Center for Economic Science, revised Sep 2017.
    2. Butler, David & Cheung, Stephen L., 2018. "Mind, Body, Bubble! Psychological and Biophysical Dimensions of Behavior in Experimental Asset Markets," IZA Discussion Papers 11563, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Asset market; Bubble; Experiment; Gender;

    JEL classification:

    • C91 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Laboratory, Individual Behavior
    • G02 - Financial Economics - - General - - - Behavioral Finance: Underlying Principles
    • G11 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Portfolio Choice; Investment Decisions
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination

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