IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/fpr/ifprid/1490.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Lost in translation: The fractured conversation about trade and food security:

Author

Listed:
  • Díaz-Bonilla, Eugenio

Abstract

There is a heated debate among policy makers, civil society, and analysts about the impact of trade and trade policies on food security. While there have been several empirical reviews on these issues the controversy has not abated. This paper surveys possible reasons why the polemic continues and why it may be difficult to settle it unequivocally. The reasons are related to the different notions of trade, food and nutrition security, the variety of possible indicators for those concepts, the multiplicity of channels through which trade and food and nutrition security notions interact, the diversity of analytical and quantitative approaches utilized, and differences in values and conceptual priors about the operation of the world economy. The paper concludes with some reflections about what can be reasonably said about the potential impacts of trade on food security.

Suggested Citation

  • Díaz-Bonilla, Eugenio, 2015. "Lost in translation: The fractured conversation about trade and food security:," IFPRI discussion papers 1490, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  • Handle: RePEc:fpr:ifprid:1490
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://cdm15738.contentdm.oclc.org/utils/getfile/collection/p15738coll2/id/129861/filename/130072.pdf
    Download Restriction: no
    ---><---

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Christiaensen, Luc & Demery, Lionel & Kuhl, Jesper, 2011. "The (evolving) role of agriculture in poverty reduction--An empirical perspective," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 96(2), pages 239-254, November.
    2. Commission on Growth and Development, 2008. "The Growth Report : Strategies for Sustained Growth and Inclusive Development," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 6507, July.
    3. Deininger, Klaus & Byerlee, Derek, 2012. "The Rise of Large Farms in Land Abundant Countries: Do They Have a Future?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(4), pages 701-714.
    4. Alberto Chong & Virgilio Galdo & Máximo Torero, 2009. "Access to Telephone Services and Household Income in Poor Rural Areas Using a Quasi‐natural Experiment for Peru," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 76(304), pages 623-648, October.
    5. Lars Brink, 2009. "WTO Constraints on Domestic Support in Agriculture: Past and Future," Canadian Journal of Agricultural Economics/Revue canadienne d'agroeconomie, Canadian Agricultural Economics Society/Societe canadienne d'agroeconomie, vol. 57(1), pages 1-21, March.
    6. Crafts, N F R, 1973. "Trade as a Handmaiden of Growth: An Alternative View," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 83(331), pages 875-884, September.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Barlow, Pepita & Loopstra, Rachel & Tarasuk, Valerie & Reeves, Aaron, 2020. "Liberal trade policy and food insecurity across the income distribution: an observational analysis in 132 countries, 2014–17," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 105815, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Rabah Arezki & Klaus Deininger & Harris Selod, 2015. "What Drives the Global "Land Rush"?," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 29(2), pages 207-233.
    2. Williams, Joycelyn, 2012. "Beyond Macroeconomic Stability: The Role of Selective Interventions in Guyana’s Growth," MPRA Paper 42755, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Van, Germinal, 2020. "The Effect of Economic Sectors on the National Income of West African Economies from 2010 to 2019: A Multiple Regression Analysis," MPRA Paper 102417, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Tomich, Thomas P. & Lidder, Preetmoninder & Coley, Mariah & Gollin, Douglas & Meinzen-Dick, Ruth & Webb, Patrick & Carberry, Peter, 2019. "Food and agricultural innovation pathways for prosperity," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 172(C), pages 1-15.
    5. Satis Devkota & Mukti Upadhyay, 2013. "Agricultural Productivity and Poverty Reduction in Nepal," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 17(4), pages 732-746, November.
    6. Van den Broeck, Goedele & Swinnen, Johan & Maertens, Miet, 2017. "Global value chains, large-scale farming, and poverty: Long-term effects in Senegal," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 66(C), pages 97-107.
    7. Lant Pritchett & Erik Werker, 2012. "Developing the guts of a GUT (Grand Unified Theory): elite commitment and inclusive growth," Global Development Institute Working Paper Series esid-016-12, GDI, The University of Manchester.
    8. Montfort Mlachila & René Tapsoba & Sampawende J. A. Tapsoba, 2017. "A Quality of Growth Index for Developing Countries: A Proposal," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 134(2), pages 675-710, November.
    9. Rabah Arezki & Klaus Deininger & Harris Selod, 2015. "What Drives the Global "Land Rush"?," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 29(2), pages 207-233.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    trade; food security; nutrition security; developing countries; gender;
    All these keywords.

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:fpr:ifprid:1490. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/ifprius.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (email available below). General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/ifprius.html .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.