IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/fpr/ifprid/1278.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

The impact of alternative input subsidy exit strategies on Malawi’s maize commodity market:

Author

Listed:
  • Mapila, Mariam A. T. J.

Abstract

This study has been conducted in order to generate evidence of the visibility of exit from farm input subsidies in an African context. The study simulates the impact of alternative exit strategies from Malawi’s farm input subsidy program on maize markets. The simulation is conducted using a multiequation partial equilibrium model of the national maize market, which is sequentially linked via a price-linkage equation to local rural maize markets. The model accounts for market imperfections prevailing in the country that arise from government price interventions. Findings show that some alternative exit strategies have negative and sustained impacts on maize yields, production, and acreage allocated to maize over the simulation period. Market prices rise steadily as a result of the implementation of different exit strategies. Despite higher maize prices, domestic maize consumption remains fairly stable, with a slow but increasing trend over the simulation period.

Suggested Citation

  • Mapila, Mariam A. T. J., 2013. "The impact of alternative input subsidy exit strategies on Malawi’s maize commodity market:," IFPRI discussion papers 1278, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  • Handle: RePEc:fpr:ifprid:1278
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.ifpri.org/sites/default/files/publications/ifpridp01278.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Gallagher, Paul W., 1978. "The Effectiveness of Price Support Policy--Some Evidence for U.S. Corn Acreage Response," Staff General Research Papers Archive 12561, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    2. Gallagher, Paul, 1978. "The Effectiveness Of Price Support Policy-Some Evidence For U.S. Corn Acreage Response," Agricultural Economics Research, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, issue 4.
    3. Jayne, Thomas S. & Mason, Nicole M. & Myers, Robert J. & Ferris, John N. & Mather, David & Sitko, Nicholas & Beaver, Margaret & Lenski, Natalie & Chapoto, Antony & Boughton, Duncan, 2010. "Patterns and Trends in Food Staples Markets in Eastern and Southern Africa: Toward the Identification of Priority Investments and Strategies for Developing Markets and Promoting Smallholder Productivi," Food Security International Development Working Papers 62148, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    4. Michael Morris & Valerie A. Kelly & Ron J. Kopicki & Derek Byerlee, 2007. "Fertilizer Use in African Agriculture : Lessons Learned and Good Practice Guidelines," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 6650.
    5. Jacob Ricker-Gilbert & Thomas S. Jayne & Ephraim Chirwa, 2010. "Subsidies and Crowding Out: A Double-Hurdle Model of Fertilizer Demand in Malawi," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 93(1), pages 26-42.
    6. Chibwana, Christopher & Fisher, Monica & Shively, Gerald, 2012. "Cropland Allocation Effects of Agricultural Input Subsidies in Malawi," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 124-133.
    7. Gallagher, Paul W., 1978. "The Effectiveness Of Price Support Policy--Some Evidence For U.S. Corn Acreage Response," Staff Papers 14140, University of Minnesota, Department of Applied Economics.
    8. Mapila, Mariam A. T. J. & Kirsten, Johann F. & Meyer, Ferdinand & Kankwamba, Henry, 2013. "A partial equilibrium model of the Malawi maize commodity market:," IFPRI discussion papers 1254, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    9. Gladwin, Christina H., 1992. "Gendered impacts of fertilizer subsidy removal programs in Malawi and Cameroon," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 7(2), pages 141-153, July.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    fertilizer subsidies; farm input allocation; subsidy reform; partial equilibrium model; Agricultural policies; maize;

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:fpr:ifprid:1278. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/ifprius.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.