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Are young borrowers bad borrowers? Evidence from the Credit CARD Act of 2009

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  • Peter Debbaut
  • Andra C. Ghent
  • Marianna Kudlyak

Abstract

Young borrowers are the least experienced financially and, conventionally, thought to be most prone to financial mistakes. We study the relationship between age and financial problems related to credit cards. Our results challenge the notion that young borrowers are bad borrowers. We show that young borrowers are among the least likely to experience a serious credit card default. We then exploit the 2009 CARD Act to identify which individuals self-select into obtaining a credit card early in life. We find that individuals who choose early credit card use default less and are more likely to get a mortgage while young.

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  • Peter Debbaut & Andra C. Ghent & Marianna Kudlyak, 2013. "Are young borrowers bad borrowers? Evidence from the Credit CARD Act of 2009," Working Paper 13-09, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedrwp:13-09
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    Cited by:

    1. Han, Song & Keys, Benjamin J. & Li, Geng, 2015. "Information, Contract Design, and Unsecured Credit Supply: Evidence from Credit Card Mailings," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2015-103, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    2. Sumit Agarwal & Souphala Chomsisengphet & Neale Mahoney & Johannes Stroebel, 2015. "Regulating Consumer Financial Products: Evidence from Credit Cards," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 130(1), pages 111-164.
    3. Agarwal, Sumit & Hu, Luojia & Huang, Xing, 2013. "Rushing into American Dream? House Prices, Timing of Homeownership, and Adjustment of Consumer Credit," Working Paper Series WP-2013-13, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.

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