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Credit risk transfer and de facto GSE reform

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  • David Finkelstein
  • Andreas Strzodka
  • James Vickery

Abstract

We summarize and evaluate Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac?s credit risk transfer (CRT) programs, which have been used since 2013 to shift a portion of credit risk on more than $1.8 trillion of mortgages to private sector investors. We argue that the CRT programs have been successful in reducing the exposure of the federal government to mortgage credit risk without disrupting the liquidity or stability of mortgage secondary markets. In the process, the programs have created a new financial market for pricing and trading mortgage credit risk, which has grown in size and liquidity over time. The CRT programs provide an important building block to help facilitate reform of the U.S. housing finance system.

Suggested Citation

  • David Finkelstein & Andreas Strzodka & James Vickery, 2018. "Credit risk transfer and de facto GSE reform," Staff Reports 838, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fednsr:838
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    3. W. Scott Frame & Andreas Fuster & Joseph Tracy & James Vickery, 2015. "The Rescue of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 29(2), pages 25-52, Spring.
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    5. Reinhart, Karmen & Rogoff, Kenneth, 2009. ""This time is different": panorama of eight centuries of financial crises," Economic Policy, Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration, vol. 1, pages 77-114, March.
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    8. Erik Hurst & Benjamin J. Keys & Amit Seru & Joseph Vavra, 2016. "Regional Redistribution through the US Mortgage Market," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 106(10), pages 2982-3028, October.
    9. Lucas, Deborah (ed.), 2010. "Measuring and Managing Federal Financial Risk," National Bureau of Economic Research Books, University of Chicago Press, number 9780226496580, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Wayne Passmore & Alexander H. von Hafften, 2018. "GSE guarantees, financial stability, and home equity accumulation," Economic Policy Review, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, issue 24-3, pages 11-27.
    2. Jesper Berg & Morten Bækmand Nielsen & James Vickery, 2018. "Peas in a pod? Comparing the U.S. and Danish mortgage finance systems," Economic Policy Review, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, issue 24-3, pages 63-87.
    3. W. Scott Frame & Joseph Tracy, 2018. "Introduction to Special Issue: The Appropriate Role of Government in U.S. Mortgage Markets," Economic Policy Review, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, issue 24-3, pages 1-10.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    mortgage; securitization; credit risk transfer; Freddie Mac; GSE; Fannie Mae;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • G10 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - General (includes Measurement and Data)
    • G28 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Government Policy and Regulation
    • G23 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Non-bank Financial Institutions; Financial Instruments; Institutional Investors
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • G18 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Government Policy and Regulation

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