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Introduction to Special Issue: The Appropriate Role of Government in U.S. Mortgage Markets

Author

Listed:
  • W. Scott Frame
  • Joseph Tracy

Abstract

The U.S. mortgage finance system was one of the focal points of the 2007-08 financial crisis, yet legislative decisions about the appropriate role of the federal government in the system remain unsettled. Policy deliberations have focused on Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac?the two enormous government-sponsored enterprises that were placed into federal conservatorship in September 2008. The two GSEs have long been the centerpieces of a mortgage finance system that relies on capital market financing of U.S. residential mortgages. This volume contains eight articles that touch on several key components of housing finance reform. We hope that the insights offered here will assist legislative efforts aimed at promoting a more efficient, equitable, and financially sound mortgage system in the future.

Suggested Citation

  • W. Scott Frame & Joseph Tracy, 2018. "Introduction to Special Issue: The Appropriate Role of Government in U.S. Mortgage Markets," Economic Policy Review, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, issue 24-3, pages 1-10.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fednep:00051
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    File URL: https://www.newyorkfed.org/research/epr/medialibrary/media/research/epr/2018/EPR_2018_intro-to-volume_frame?la=en
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. W. Scott Frame & Andreas Fuster & Joseph Tracy & James Vickery, 2015. "The Rescue of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 29(2), pages 25-52, Spring.
    2. Jane K. Dokko, 2018. "Housing affordability: recommendations for new research to guide policy," Economic Policy Review, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, issue 24-3, pages 138-144.
    3. Donghoon Lee & Joseph Tracy, 2018. "Long-term outcomes of FHA first-time homebuyers," Economic Policy Review, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, issue 24-3, pages 145-165.
    4. David Finkelstein & Andreas Strzodka & James Vickery, 2018. "Credit risk transfer and de facto GSE reform," Economic Policy Review, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, issue 24-3, pages 88-116.
    5. Brent W. Ambrose & Zhongyi Yuan, 2018. "Pricing government credit: a new method for determining government credit risk exposure," Economic Policy Review, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, issue 24-3, pages 41-62.
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    Cited by:

    1. Amine Ouazad & Matthew E. Kahn, 2019. "Mortgage Finance and Climate Change: Securitization Dynamics in the Aftermath of Natural Disasters," NBER Working Papers 26322, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    mortgages; housing finance; Freddie Mac; financial crisis; Fannie Mae; government intervention;

    JEL classification:

    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • G28 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Government Policy and Regulation
    • G01 - Financial Economics - - General - - - Financial Crises
    • G22 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Insurance; Insurance Companies; Actuarial Studies
    • H12 - Public Economics - - Structure and Scope of Government - - - Crisis Management

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