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Engineering a paradox of thrift recession

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  • Zhen Huo
  • Jose-Victor Rios-Rull

Abstract

We build a variation of the neoclassical growth model in which financial shocks to households or wealth shocks (in the sense of wealth destruction) generate recessions. Two standard ingredients that are necessary are (1) the existence of adjustment costs that make the expansion of the tradable goods sector difficult and (2) the existence of some frictions in the labor market that prevent enormous reductions in real wages (Nash bargaining in Mortensen-Pissarides labor markets is enough). We pose a new ingredient that greatly magnifies the recession: a reduction in consumption expenditures reduces measured productivity, while technology is unchanged due to reduced utilization of production capacity. Our model provides a novel, quantitative theory of the current recessions in southern Europe.

Suggested Citation

  • Zhen Huo & Jose-Victor Rios-Rull, 2012. "Engineering a paradox of thrift recession," Staff Report 478, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedmsr:478
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Krueger, D. & Mitman, K. & Perri, F., 2016. "Macroeconomics and Household Heterogeneity," Handbook of Macroeconomics, Elsevier.
    2. Zhen Huo & Jose-Victor Rios-Rull, 2015. "Tightening Financial Frictions on Households, Recessions, and Price Reallocations," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 18(1), pages 118-139, January.
    3. Hintermaier, Thomas & Koeniger, Winfried, 2015. "Household Debt and Crises of Confidence," Economics Working Paper Series 1518, University of St. Gallen, School of Economics and Political Science.
    4. Claudio Baccianti & Andreas Löschel, 2014. "The Role of Product and Process Innovation in CGE Models of Environmental Policy," WWWforEurope Working Papers series 68, WWWforEurope.
    5. Hintermaier, Thomas & Koeniger, Winfried, 2015. "Household Debt and Crises of Confidence," Economics Working Paper Series 1518, University of St. Gallen, School of Economics and Political Science.
    6. Finkelstein Shapiro, Alan & Mandelman, Federico S., 2016. "Remittances, entrepreneurship, and employment dynamics over the business cycle," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 103(C), pages 184-199.
    7. repec:eee:macchp:v2-1427 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Li, Jieying & Zhang, Xin, 2017. "House Prices, Home Equity, and Personal Debt Composition," Working Paper Series 343, Sveriges Riksbank (Central Bank of Sweden).

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    Keywords

    Recessions;

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