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Voting on social security: evidence from OECD countries

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  • Friedrich Breyer
  • Ben R. Craig

Abstract

An examination of the subset of public choice models for Social Security that have empirical implications. The data, collected from OECD countries for the years 1960, 1970, 1980 and 1990, show that higher median voter age, greater income heterogeneity, similarity in family size, and variables that make a public pension program profitable are all associated with a larger program.

Suggested Citation

  • Friedrich Breyer & Ben R. Craig, 1995. "Voting on social security: evidence from OECD countries," Working Papers (Old Series) 9511, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedcwp:9511
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Congleton, Roger D & Shughart, William F, II, 1990. "The Growth of Social Security: Electoral Push or Political Pull?," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 28(1), pages 109-132, January.
    2. Breyer, Friedrich & von der Schulenburg, J-Matthias Graf, 1990. "Family Ties and Social Security in a Democracy," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 67(2), pages 155-167, November.
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    5. Greene, Kenneth V, 1974. "Toward a Positive Theory of Intergenerational Income Transfers," Public Finance = Finances publiques, , vol. 29(3-4), pages 306-324.
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    7. Boadway, Robin W & Wildasin, David E, 1989. "A Median Voter Model of Social Security," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 30(2), pages 307-328, May.
    8. Browning, Edgar K, 1975. "Why the Social Insurance Budget Is Too Large in a Democracy," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 13(3), pages 373-388, September.
    9. Friedrich Breyer & J.‐Matthias Graf V. D. Schulenburg**, 1987. "Voting on Social Security: The Family as Decision‐Making Unit," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 40(4), pages 529-547, November.
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    12. Breyer, Friedrich & Graf v d Schulenburg, J-Matthias, 1987. "Voting on Social Security: The Family as Decision-Making Unit," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 40(4), pages 529-547.
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