IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/fip/fedbcq/2015_003.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Global standards for liquidity regulation

Author

Listed:
  • Eva Liebmann
  • Joe Peek

Abstract

Liquidity risk has received increased attention recently, especially in light of the 2007 - 2009 financial crisis, when banks' extensive reliance on short-term funding, maturity mismatches between assets and liabilities, and insufficient liquidity buffers made them quite susceptible to liquidity risk. To mitigate such risk, the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision (BCBS) introduced an improved global capital framework and new global liquidity standards for banks in December 2010 in the form of the new Basel Accord (Basel III). This brief offers insights from the crisis experience, identifies the problems that the new liquidity regulation aims to address, and summarizes underlying differences between the United States and Europe that may affect the ability to design and implement consistent global standards.

Suggested Citation

  • Eva Liebmann & Joe Peek, 2015. "Global standards for liquidity regulation," Current Policy Perspectives 15-3, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedbcq:2015_003
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.bostonfed.org/economic/current-policy-perspectives/2015/cpp1503.pdf
    File Function: Full text
    Download Restriction: no
    ---><---

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Asli Demirguc-Kunt & Enrica Detragiache & Ouarda Merrouche, 2013. "Bank Capital: Lessons from the Financial Crisis," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 45(6), pages 1147-1164, September.
    2. Gaston Giordana & Ingmar Schumacher, 2011. "The Impact of the Basel III Liquidity Regulations on the Bank Lending Channel: A Luxembourg case study," BCL working papers 61, Central Bank of Luxembourg.
    3. Lannoo, Karel, 2015. "Which Union for Europe’s Capital Markets?," ECMI Papers 10035, Centre for European Policy Studies.
    4. Emmanuel Farhi & Jean Tirole, 2012. "Collective Moral Hazard, Maturity Mismatch, and Systemic Bailouts," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 102(1), pages 60-93, February.
    5. Ms. Anne Marie Gulde, 1997. "Liquid Asset Ratios and Financial Sector Reform," IMF Working Papers 1997/144, International Monetary Fund.
    6. Markus K. Brunnermeier, 2009. "Deciphering the Liquidity and Credit Crunch 2007-2008," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 23(1), pages 77-100, Winter.
    7. Banerjee, Ryan N. & Mio, Hitoshi, 2018. "The impact of liquidity regulation on banks," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 35(PB), pages 30-44.
    8. Morten Bech & Todd Keister, 2012. "On the liquidity coverage ratio and monetary policy implementation," BIS Quarterly Review, Bank for International Settlements, December.
    9. Kane, Edward J, 1981. "Accelerating Inflation, Technological Innovation, and the Decreasing Effectiveness of Banking Regulation," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 36(2), pages 355-367, May.
    10. Caballero, R J. & Krishnamurthy, A., 2008. "Musical chairs: a comment on the credit crisis," Financial Stability Review, Banque de France, issue 11, pages 9-11, February.
    11. Michal Kowalik, 2013. "Basel liquidity regulation: was it improved with the 2013 revisions?," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, issue Q II, pages 65-87.
    12. Claudio Borio, 2010. "Ten propositions about liquidity crises," CESifo Economic Studies, CESifo, vol. 56(1), pages 70-95, March.
    13. Clemens Bonner & Paul Hilbers, 2015. "Global liquidity regulation - Why did it take so long?," DNB Working Papers 455, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.
    14. Beirne, John & Dalitz, Lars & Ejsing, Jacob & Grothe, Magdalena & Manganelli, Simone & Monar, Fernando & Sahel, Benjamin & Sušec, Matjaž & Tapking, Jens & Vong, Tana, 2011. "The impact of the Eurosystem's covered bond purchase programme on the primary and secondary markets," Occasional Paper Series 122, European Central Bank.
    15. Jay Surti, 2010. "Can Covered Bonds Resuscitate Residential Mortgage Finance in the United States?," IMF Working Papers 2010/277, International Monetary Fund.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Clemens Bonner & Iman Lelyveld & Robert Zymek, 2015. "Banks’ Liquidity Buffers and the Role of Liquidity Regulation," Journal of Financial Services Research, Springer;Western Finance Association, vol. 48(3), pages 215-234, December.
    2. Apergis, Emmanuel & Apergis, Iraklis & Apergis, Nicholas, 2019. "A new macro stress testing approach for financial realignment in the Eurozone," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 52-80.
    3. Bonfim, D. & Kim, M., 2012. "Liquidity Risk in Banking : Is there Herding?," Other publications TiSEM 6e6df5ea-401b-49a2-b1be-4, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
    4. Gropp, Reint E. & Radev, Deyan, 2017. "International banking conglomerates and the transmission of lending shocks across borders," IWH Discussion Papers 19/2017, Halle Institute for Economic Research (IWH).
    5. Jakob Korbinian Eberl, 2016. "The Collateral Framework of the Eurosystem and Its Fiscal Implications," ifo Beiträge zur Wirtschaftsforschung, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, number 69, November.
    6. João M. Pinto & Mafalda C. Correia, 2017. "Are Covered Bonds Different from Asset Securitization Bonds?," Working Papers de Gestão (Management Working Papers) 01, Católica Porto Business School, Universidade Católica Portuguesa.
    7. Diana Bonfim & Moshe Kim, 2012. "Systemic Liquidity Risk," Economic Bulletin and Financial Stability Report Articles and Banco de Portugal Economic Studies, Banco de Portugal, Economics and Research Department.
    8. Gropp, Reint & Radev, Deyan, 2017. "International banking conglomerates and the transmission of lending shocks across borders," SAFE Working Paper Series 175, Leibniz Institute for Financial Research SAFE.
    9. Bonner, Clemens & Wedow, Michael & Budnik, Katarzyna & Koban, Anne & Kok, Christoffer & Laliotis, Dimitrios & Meller, Barbara & Melo, Ana Sofia & Moldovan, Iulia & Schmitz, Stefan & Couaillier, Cyril , 2018. "Systemic liquidity concept, measurement and macroprudential instruments," Occasional Paper Series 214, European Central Bank.
    10. King, Timothy & Srivastav, Abhishek & Williams, Jonathan, 2016. "What's in an education? Implications of CEO education for bank performance," Journal of Corporate Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 287-308.
    11. Kanga, Désiré & Murinde, Victor & Soumaré, Issouf, 2020. "Capital, risk and profitability of WAEMU banks: Does bank ownership matter?," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 114(C).
    12. Anatoli Segura & Javier Suarez, 2017. "How Excessive Is Banks’ Maturity Transformation?," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 30(10), pages 3538-3580.
    13. Ernesto Pasten, 2020. "Prudential Policies and Bailouts: A Delicate Interaction," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 38, pages 181-197, October.
    14. Burkhard Raunig & Johann Scharler & Friedrich Sindermann, 2017. "Do Banks Lend Less in Uncertain Times?," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 84(336), pages 682-711, October.
    15. Agur, Itai & Demertzis, Maria, 2013. "“Leaning against the wind” and the timing of monetary policy," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 179-194.
    16. Keiichiro Kobayashi & Tomoyuki Nakajima, 2014. "A macroeconomic model of liquidity crises," KIER Working Papers 876, Kyoto University, Institute of Economic Research.
    17. Ozlem Akin & José M Marín & José-Luis Peydró, 2020. "Anticipating the financial crisis: evidence from insider trading in banks," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 35(102), pages 213-267.
    18. Brunnermeier, Markus K. & Oehmke, Martin, 2013. "Bubbles, Financial Crises, and Systemic Risk," Handbook of the Economics of Finance, in: G.M. Constantinides & M. Harris & R. M. Stulz (ed.), Handbook of the Economics of Finance, volume 2, chapter 0, pages 1221-1288, Elsevier.
    19. Kristoffer Milonas, 2018. "Bank Taxes, Leverage, and Risk," Journal of Financial Services Research, Springer;Western Finance Association, vol. 54(2), pages 145-177, October.
    20. Xavier Vives, 2014. "Strategic Complementarity, Fragility, and Regulation," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 27(12), pages 3547-3592.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • F33 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - International Monetary Arrangements and Institutions
    • G01 - Financial Economics - - General - - - Financial Crises
    • G28 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Government Policy and Regulation

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:fip:fedbcq:2015_003. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/frbbous.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (email available below). General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/frbbous.html .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.