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The Impact of the Basel III Liquidity Regulations on the Bank Lending Channel: A Luxembourg case study

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  • Gaston Giordana

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  • Ingmar Schumacher

    ()

Abstract

In this paper we study the impact of the Basel III liquidity regulations, namely the Liquidity Coverage Ratio (LCR) and the Net Stable Funding Ratio (NSFR), on the bank lending channel in Luxembourg. For this aim we built, based on individual bank data, time series of the LCR and NSFR for a sample of banks covering between 82% and 100% of total assets of the banking sector. Additionally, we simulated the optimal balance sheet adjustments needed to adhere to the regulations. We extend the existing literature on the identification of the bank lending channel by adding as banks characteristics the estimated shortfalls in both the LCR and NSFR. We find a significant role for the bank lending channel in Luxembourg which mainly works through small banks with a large shortfall in the NSFR. We also show that big banks are able to increase their lending following a contractionary monetary policy shock, in line with the fact that big banks in Luxembourg are liquidity providers. Our extrapolation and simulation results suggest that the bank lending channel will no longer be effective in Luxembourg once banks adhere to the Basel III liquidity regulations. We find that adhering to the NSFR may reduce the bank lending channel more strongly than complying with the LCR.

Suggested Citation

  • Gaston Giordana & Ingmar Schumacher, 2011. "The Impact of the Basel III Liquidity Regulations on the Bank Lending Channel: A Luxembourg case study," BCL working papers 61, Central Bank of Luxembourg.
  • Handle: RePEc:bcl:bclwop:bclwp061
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    File URL: http://www.bcl.lu/fr/Recherche/publications/cahiers_etudes/61/BCLWP061.pdf
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Antonio Scalia & Sergio Longoni & Tiziana Rosolin, 2013. "The Net Stable Funding Ratio and banks� participation in monetary policy operations: some evidence for the euro area," Questioni di Economia e Finanza (Occasional Papers) 195, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    2. Jane Gathigia Muriithi & Kennedy Munyua Waweru, 2017. "Liquidity Risk and Financial Performance of Commercial Banks in Kenya," International Journal of Economics and Finance, Canadian Center of Science and Education, vol. 9(3), pages 256-265, March.
    3. Liebmann, Eva & Peek, Joe, 2015. "Global standards for liquidity regulation," Current Policy Perspectives 15-3, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    4. Dirk Mevis, 2012. "The Determinants of Short Term Funding in Luxembourgish Banks," BCL working papers 80, Central Bank of Luxembourg.
    5. repec:gam:jjrfmx:v:10:y:2017:i:2:p:8-:d:95645 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Gastón Andrés Giordana & Ingmar Schumacher, 2017. "An Empirical Study on the Impact of Basel III Standards on Banks’ Default Risk: The Case of Luxembourg," Journal of Risk and Financial Management, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 10(2), pages 1-21, April.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    bank; bank lending channel; monetary policy; Basel III; LCR; NSFR;

    JEL classification:

    • E51 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Money Supply; Credit; Money Multipliers
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • G28 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Government Policy and Regulation

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