IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/fip/fedawp/97-11.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Normalization, probability distribution, and impulse responses

Author

Listed:
  • Daniel F. Waggoner
  • Tao Zha

Abstract

When impulse responses in dynamic multivariate models such as identified VARs are given economic interpretations, it is important that reliable statistical inferences be provided. Before probability assessments are provided, however, the model must be normalized. Contrary to the conventional wisdom, this paper argues that normalization, a rule of reversing signs of coefficients in equations in a particular way, could considerably affect the shape of the likelihood and thus probability bands for impulse responses. A new concept called ML distance normalization is introduced to avoid distorting the shape of the likelihood. Moreover, this paper develops a Monte Carlo simulation technique for implementing ML distance normalization.

Suggested Citation

  • Daniel F. Waggoner & Tao Zha, 1997. "Normalization, probability distribution, and impulse responses," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 97-11, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedawp:97-11
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.frbatlanta.org//filelegacydocs/wp9711.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Ben S. Bernanke & Mark Gertler & Mark Watson, 1997. "Systematic Monetary Policy and the Effects of Oil Price Shocks," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 28(1), pages 91-157.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. António AFONSO & Ricardo SOUSA, "undated". "Fiscal Policy, Housing and Stock Prices," EcoMod2010 259600005, EcoMod.
    2. Marco Del Negro & Francesc Obiols-Homs, 2001. "Has monetary policy been so bad that it is better to get rid of it? The case of Mexico," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, pages 404-439.
    3. Gert Peersman, 2005. "What caused the early millennium slowdown? Evidence based on vector autoregressions," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(2), pages 185-207.
    4. Daniel F. Waggoner & Tao Zha, 1999. "Conditional Forecasts In Dynamic Multivariate Models," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 81(4), pages 639-651, November.
    5. Waggoner, Daniel F. & Zha, Tao, 2003. "Likelihood preserving normalization in multiple equation models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 114(2), pages 329-347, June.
    6. Besnik Fetai, 2011. "Exchange Rate Pass-Through in Transition Economies: The Case of the Republic of Macedonia," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series wp1014, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
    7. Kim, Soyoung, 2001. "International transmission of U.S. monetary policy shocks: Evidence from VAR's," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(2), pages 339-372, October.
    8. Andrea Nobili & Stefano Neri, 2006. "The transmission of monetary policy shocks from the US to the euro area," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 606, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    9. Daniel F. Waggoner & Tao Zha, 2000. "A Gibbs simulator for restricted VAR models," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2000-3, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
    10. Andrzej Kociêcki, 2003. "On Priors for Impulse Responses in Bayesian Structural VAR Models," Econometrics 0307006, EconWPA.
    11. massimo franchi, 2002. "A Non-Causal Identification Scheme for Vector Autoregressions," Computing in Economics and Finance 2002 290, Society for Computational Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Econometric models ; Monetary policy;

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:fip:fedawp:97-11. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Elaine Clokey). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/frbatus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.