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The impact of 9/11 on hours of work in the United States

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  • Julie L. Hotchkiss
  • Olga Pavlova

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to determine whether workers? commitment to the labor force declined after 9/11, as many popular press accounts at the time suggested it would. The results indicate that any measured decline in hours spent working was the result of economic conditions rather than changes in desired hours of work. Controlling for economic conditions, hours of work after 9/11 actually increased on average compared to before 9/11; no significant change in hours spent working occurred among residents of New York City, however.

Suggested Citation

  • Julie L. Hotchkiss & Olga Pavlova, 2004. "The impact of 9/11 on hours of work in the United States," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2004-16, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedawp:2004-16
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Smith, James P & Ward, Michael P, 1985. "Time-Series Growth in the Female Labor Force," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 3(1), pages 59-90, January.
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