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Total Factor Productivity Growth when Factors of Production Generate Environmental Externalities

Author

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  • Anastasios Xeapapadeas

    (Athens University of Economics and Business)

  • Dimitra Vouvaki

    (University of Crete)

Abstract

Total factor productivity growth (TFPG) has been traditionally associated with technological change. We show that when a factor of production, such as energy, generates an environmental externality in the form of CO2 emissions which is not internalized because of lack of environmental policy, then TFPG estimates could be biased. This is because the contribution of environment as a factor of production is not accounted for in the growth accounting framework. Empirical estimates confirm this hypothesis and suggest that part of what is regarded as technology’s contribution to growth could be attributed to the use of environment in output production.

Suggested Citation

  • Anastasios Xeapapadeas & Dimitra Vouvaki, 2009. "Total Factor Productivity Growth when Factors of Production Generate Environmental Externalities," Working Papers 2009.20, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
  • Handle: RePEc:fem:femwpa:2009.20
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Tol, Richard S. J., 2005. "The marginal damage costs of carbon dioxide emissions: an assessment of the uncertainties," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(16), pages 2064-2074, November.
    2. Barro, Robert J, 1999. "Notes on Growth Accounting," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 4(2), pages 119-137, June.
    3. Scott L. Baier & Gerald P. Dwyer & Robert Tamura, 2006. "How Important are Capital and Total Factor Productivity for Economic Growth?," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 44(1), pages 23-49, January.
    4. Vangelis Tzouvelekas & Dimitra Vouvaki & Anastasios Xepapadeas, 2006. "Total Factor Productivity Growth and the Environment: A Case for Green Growth Accounting," Working Papers 0617, University of Crete, Department of Economics.
    5. Griffin, James M, 1981. "Engineering and Econometric Interpretations of Energy-Capital Complementarity: Comment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 71(5), pages 1100-1104, December.
    6. Daniel J. Henderson & R. Robert Russell, 2005. "Human Capital And Convergence: A Production-Frontier Approach ," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 46(4), pages 1167-1205, November.
    7. Tahvonen Olli & Kuuluvainen Jari, 1993. "Economic Growth, Pollution, and Renewable Resources," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 24(2), pages 101-118, March.
    8. Mundlak, Yair, 1996. "Production Function Estimation: Reviving the Primal," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 64(2), pages 431-438, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Curran, Michael & Kiteme, Boniface & Wünscher, Tobias & Koellner, Thomas & Hellweg, Stefanie, 2016. "Pay the farmer, or buy the land?—Cost-effectiveness of payments for ecosystem services versus land purchases or easements in Central Kenya," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 127(C), pages 59-67.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Total Factor Productivity; Sources of Growth; Environmental Externalities; Energy; Environmental Policy;

    JEL classification:

    • O47 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Empirical Studies of Economic Growth; Aggregate Productivity; Cross-Country Output Convergence
    • Q20 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - General
    • Q43 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Energy and the Macroeconomy

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