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Does democracy reduce the HIV epidemic? Evidence from Kenya

Author

Listed:
  • Antoine MARSAUDON

    (Université Paris I Panthéon-Sorbonne)

  • Josselin THUILLIEZ

    () (Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne - Université de Paris I)

Abstract

Does democracy help Kenyan citizens to struggle against the HIV epidemic? Yet, very little attention has been devoted to establish whether political regimes react differently to the HIV infection. Using an electoral definition of democracy makes a contribution in understanding which aspects of political rules matter to manage the disease. Using a difference-in-difference design that draws upon pre-existing variations in HIV intensity and cohort’s exposure to democracy, we find that a person living under democracy is less likely to have a HIV infection. Further, we present some evidence of ethnic favoritism and gender disparities during periods of non-democracy.

Suggested Citation

  • Antoine MARSAUDON & Josselin THUILLIEZ, 2016. "Does democracy reduce the HIV epidemic? Evidence from Kenya," Working Papers P167, FERDI.
  • Handle: RePEc:fdi:wpaper:3281
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    institution; democracy; HIV; Health; Kenya;

    JEL classification:

    • I15 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health and Economic Development
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • O38 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Government Policy
    • P51 - Economic Systems - - Comparative Economic Systems - - - Comparative Analysis of Economic Systems

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