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Structural Shift in Demand for Food: Projections for 2020

  • Surabhi Mittal

    ()

Knowledge of demand structure and consumer behaviour is essential for a wide range of development policy questions like improvement in nutritional status, food subsidy, sectoral and macroeconomic policy analysis, etc. An analysis of food consumption patterns and how they are likely to shift with changes in income and relative price is required to assess the food security-related policy issues in the agricultural sector. [Working Paper No. 184]

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Paper provided by eSocialSciences in its series Working Papers with number id:2788.

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Date of creation: Aug 2010
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Handle: RePEc:ess:wpaper:id:2788
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  1. Shenggen Fan & Peter Hazell & Sukhadeo Thorat, 2000. "Government Spending, Growth and Poverty in Rural India," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 82(4), pages 1038-1051.
  2. Deaton, A., 1990. "Price Elasticities From Surveys Data: Extensions And Indonesian Results," Papers 69, World Bank - Living Standards Measurement.
  3. Trueblood, Michael A. & Shapouri, Shahla, 2001. "Implications of Trade Liberalization on Food Security of Low-income Countries," Agricultural Information Bulletins 33705, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
  4. Christensen, Laurits R & Jorgenson, Dale W & Lau, Lawrence J, 1975. "Transcendental Logarithmic Utility Functions," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 65(3), pages 367-83, June.
  5. Huang, Jikun. & Bouis, Howarth E., 1996. "Structural changes in the demand for food in Asia.:," 2020 vision discussion papers 11, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  6. Deaton, Angus S & Muellbauer, John, 1980. "An Almost Ideal Demand System," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 70(3), pages 312-26, June.
  7. Blundell, Richard & Pashardes, Panos & Weber, Guglielmo, 1993. "What Do We Learn About Consumer Demand Patterns from Micro Data?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 83(3), pages 570-97, June.
  8. Barten, A. P., 1969. "Maximum likelihood estimation of a complete system of demand equations," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 1(1), pages 7-73.
  9. J. V. Meenakshi & Ranjan Ray, 1999. "Regional differences in India's food expenditure pattern: a complete demand systems approach," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 11(1), pages 47-74.
  10. R. Radhakrishna & C. Ravi, 1992. "Effects of Growth, Relative Price and Preferences on Food and Nutrition," Indian Economic Review, Department of Economics, Delhi School of Economics, vol. 27, pages 303-323.
  11. Evenson, Robert E. & Pray, Carl E. & Rosegrant, Mark W., 1999. "Agricultural research and productivity growth in India:," Research reports 109, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
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