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Logit estimation of conditional cooperation in a repeated public goods experiment

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  • Luis G. Gonzalez

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  • Vittoria Levati

    ()

  • Graciela Gonzalez-Farias

Abstract

A conditional cooperator in a public goods game wants to match his partners' expected contribution. We investigate theoretically and empirically whether (and to what extent) conditional cooperation can explain how individual contributions evolve in a repeated two-person public goods experiment using a perfect strangers design. To identify a random utility model including non-pecuniary preferences we elicit participants' beliefs. Our econometric results show that the distribution of preferences in the population can be captured by a latent-class mixed logit specification with three subpopulations, and that 55% of participants can be regarded as conditional cooperators. Thus, the decline in average contribution levels may be attributed to the presence of conditional cooperators who have to revise their expectations about the others' behavior.

Suggested Citation

  • Luis G. Gonzalez & Vittoria Levati & Graciela Gonzalez-Farias, 2005. "Logit estimation of conditional cooperation in a repeated public goods experiment," Papers on Strategic Interaction 2005-05, Max Planck Institute of Economics, Strategic Interaction Group.
  • Handle: RePEc:esi:discus:2005-05
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Katinka Pantzy & Anthony Ziegelmeyer, 2006. "Cooperative Networks: Theory and Experimental Evidence," Papers on Strategic Interaction 2005-32, Max Planck Institute of Economics, Strategic Interaction Group.
    2. M. Levati & Andrea Morone & Annamaria Fiore, 2009. "Voluntary contributions with imperfect information: An experimental study," Public Choice, Springer, pages 199-216.
    3. Coralio Ballester & Pablo Brañas-Garza & María Paz Espinosa, 2008. "Peer effects in public contributions: theory and experimental evidence," ThE Papers 08/04, Department of Economic Theory and Economic History of the University of Granada..

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Conditional cooperation; Quantal response equilibrium; Latent class logit; Belief learning;

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