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Life satisfaction and material well-being of children in the UK

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  • Knies, Gundi

Abstract

Life satisfaction is increasingly recognised as a desirable individual outcome. Policy attention with respect to child well-being has focused on improving the financial position of families with children. Using Understanding Society I show that child life satisfaction is not associated with household income (poverty), or with a set of new material deprivation measures of child poverty, introduced to help target effective policies that make a real difference to children‟s lives. Those interested in maximizing society‟s welfare should shift their attention from an emphasis on increasing consumption opportunities for families with children to an emphasis on increasing social contacts.

Suggested Citation

  • Knies, Gundi, 2012. "Life satisfaction and material well-being of children in the UK," ISER Working Paper Series 2012-15, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:ese:iserwp:2012-15
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    File URL: https://www.iser.essex.ac.uk/research/publications/working-papers/iser/2012-15.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Andrew E. Clark & Ed Diener & Yannis Georgellis & Richard E. Lucas, 2008. "Lags And Leads in Life Satisfaction: a Test of the Baseline Hypothesis," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 118(529), pages 222-243, June.
    2. Nattavudh Powdthavee & Anna Vignoles, 2008. "Mental Health of Parents and Life Satisfaction of Children: A Within-Family Analysis of Intergenerational Transmission of Well-Being," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 88(3), pages 397-422, September.
    3. Clark, Andrew E. & Oswald, Andrew J., 1996. "Satisfaction and comparison income," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 61(3), pages 359-381, September.
    4. Frick, Joachim R. & Goebel, Jan & Schechtman, Edna & Wagner, Gert G. & Yitzhaki, Shlomo, 2004. "Using Analysis of Gini (ANoGi) for Detecting Whether Two Sub-Samples Represent the Same Universe: The SOEP Experience," IZA Discussion Papers 1049, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Ferrer-i-Carbonell, Ada, 2005. "Income and well-being: an empirical analysis of the comparison income effect," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 89(5-6), pages 997-1019, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Tamar Dinisman & Asher Ben-Arieh, 2016. "The Characteristics of Children’s Subjective Well-Being," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 126(2), pages 555-569, March.
    2. Leonardo Becchetti & Fabio Pisani, 2014. "Family Economic Well-Being, and (Class) Relative Wealth: An Empirical Analysis of Life Satisfaction of Secondary School Students in Three Italian Cities," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 15(3), pages 503-525, June.
    3. Smyth, Emer, 2016. "Wellbeing and School Experiences among 9- and 13-Year-Olds: Insights from the Growing Up in Ireland Study," Research Series, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), number BKMNEXT291.

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