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Changing Patterns in the Relative Economic Performance of Immigrants to Great Britain and the U.S., 1980-2000

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  • John Schmitt
  • Jonathan Wadsworth

Abstract

This report examines changes in the pace of the economic assimilation of immigrants over the last three decades. The evidence suggests that immigrants lagged farther behind U.S.-born workers in 2000, than they had in 1990 and 1980.

Suggested Citation

  • John Schmitt & Jonathan Wadsworth, 2006. "Changing Patterns in the Relative Economic Performance of Immigrants to Great Britain and the U.S., 1980-2000," CEPR Reports and Issue Briefs 2006-07, Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR).
  • Handle: RePEc:epo:papers:2006-07
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    File URL: http://www.cepr.net/documents/publications/immigration_2006_04.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Robert J. LaLonde & Robert H. Topel, 1992. "The Assimilation of Immigrants in the U. S. Labor Market," NBER Chapters,in: Immigration and the Workforce: Economic Consequences for the United States and Source Areas, pages 67-92 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Card, David, 2001. "Immigrant Inflows, Native Outflows, and the Local Labor Market Impacts of Higher Immigration," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 19(1), pages 22-64, January.
    3. David Card, 2005. "Is the New Immigration Really so Bad?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 115(507), pages 300-323, November.
    4. George J. Borjas, 2000. "The Economic Progress of Immigrants," NBER Chapters,in: Issues in the Economics of Immigration, pages 15-50 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Borjas, George J, 1985. "Assimilation, Changes in Cohort Quality, and the Earnings of Immigrants," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 3(4), pages 463-489, October.
    6. Edward Funkhouser, 2000. "Convergence in Employment Rates of Immigrants," NBER Chapters,in: Issues in the Economics of Immigration, pages 143-184 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Christian Dustmann & Francesca Fabbri & Ian Preston, 2005. "The Impact of Immigration on the UK Labour Market," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 0501, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
    8. George J. Borjas, 1994. "The Economics of Immigration," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 32(4), pages 1667-1717, December.
    9. LaLonde, Robert J & Topel, Robert H, 1991. "Immigrants in the American Labor Market: Quality, Assimilation, and Distributional Effects," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 81(2), pages 297-302, May.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    Cited by:

    1. David McKenzie & Pilar Garcia Martinez & L. Alan Winters, 2008. "Who is coming from Vanuatu to New Zealand under the new Recognised Seasonal Employer (RSE) Program?," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 0806, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
    2. Roland G. Fryer, Jr, 2016. "The Production of Human Capital in Developed Countries: Evidence from 196 Randomized Field Experiments," NBER Working Papers 22130, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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