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Information Sharing, Cognitive Centrality, and Influence among Business Executives during Collective Choice

Author

Listed:
  • Abele, S.C.
  • Vaughan-Parsons, S.I.
  • Stasser, G.

Abstract

Laboratory studies have shown that decision-making groups tend to focus on common information at the expense of unique information. In the current study, high level business executives completed a personnel selection task. Access to information about the candidates was not controlled as in a typical study of information sharing, but common, partially shared, and unique information arose naturally from the individual members’ information searches. During subsequent discussions, groups mentioned more common than partially shared than unique information. However, the underlying processes seemed to be different from what has been observed in laboratory studies. The popularity of information in the population from which groups were composed predicted both the number of a group’s members who accessed an item in their information searches and whether the group discussed the item. However, the number of group members who accessed an item did predict whether information was repeated during discussion, and repetition predicted which items were included on a final written summary. Finally, cognitively central group members were more influential than cognitively peripheral members.

Suggested Citation

  • Abele, S.C. & Vaughan-Parsons, S.I. & Stasser, G., 2005. "Information Sharing, Cognitive Centrality, and Influence among Business Executives during Collective Choice," ERIM Report Series Research in Management ERS-2005-037-ORG, Erasmus Research Institute of Management (ERIM), ERIM is the joint research institute of the Rotterdam School of Management, Erasmus University and the Erasmus School of Economics (ESE) at Erasmus University Rotterdam.
  • Handle: RePEc:ems:eureri:6664
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    File URL: https://repub.eur.nl/pub/6664/ERS%202005%20037%20ORG.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Hollingshead, Andrea B., 1996. "The Rank-Order Effect in Group Decision Making," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 68(3), pages 181-193, December.
    2. Gruenfeld, Deborah H & Mannix, Elizabeth A. & Williams, Katherine Y. & Neale, Margaret A., 1996. "Group Composition and Decision Making: How Member Familiarity and Information Distribution Affect Process and Performance," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 67(1), pages 1-15, July.
    3. Parks, Craig D. & Cowlin, Rebecca A., 1996. "Acceptance of Uncommon Information into Group Discussion When That Information Is or Is Not Demonstrable," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 66(3), pages 307-315, June.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    cognitive centrality; collective choice; group decision making; hidden profiles; information sharing;

    JEL classification:

    • D7 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making
    • L2 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior
    • M - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics
    • M10 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Business Administration - - - General
    • M12 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Business Administration - - - Personnel Management; Executives; Executive Compensation

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