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Education and geographical mobility: the role of the job surplus

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  • Amior, Michael

Abstract

Better-educated workers form many more long-distance job matches, and they move more quickly following local employment shocks. I argue this is a consequence of larger dispersion in wage offers, independent of geography. In a frictional market, this generates larger surpluses for workers in new matches, which can better justify the cost of moving - should the offer originate from far away. The market is then “thinner” but better integrated spatially. I motivate my hypothesis with new evidence on mobility patterns and subjective moving costs; and I test it using wage returns to local and long-distance matches over the jobs ladder.

Suggested Citation

  • Amior, Michael, 2019. "Education and geographical mobility: the role of the job surplus," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 102701, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  • Handle: RePEc:ehl:lserod:102701
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Amior, Michael, 2015. "Why are higher skilled workers more mobile geographically?: the role of the job surplus," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 61279, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
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    7. Amior, Michael, 2018. "The contribution of foreign migration to local labor market adjustment," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 91705, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
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    Cited by:

    1. Monica Langella & Alan Manning, 2019. "Diversity and Neighbourhood Satisfaction," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 129(624), pages 3219-3255.
    2. Benoît SCHMUTZ & Modibo SIDIBÉ & Élie VIDAL-NAQUET, 2020. "Why are Low-Skilled Workers less Mobile ? The role of Mobility Costs and Spatial Frictions," Working Papers 2020-15, Center for Research in Economics and Statistics.
    3. Amior, Michael, 2018. "The contribution of foreign migration to local labor market adjustment," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 91705, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    geographical mobility; job search; education;

    JEL classification:

    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population

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