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Climate Change Economics and Policy in the Asia Pacific


  • Frank Jotzo

    (Research School of Pacific and Asian Studies, The Australian National University, Australia)


The Asia-Pacific region is the major source of global growth in greenhouse gas emissions. Strong action is needed in Asian countries, particularly China and India, to reduce these global emissions. Driven by the desire to limit energy consumption, some Asian countries already have domestic policies to limit greenhouse gas emission. But much more ambitious policies are needed to turn emission trends around. This research report examines the implications of international efforts to mitigate the impacts of human activity on climate in the Asia-Pacific region.

Suggested Citation

  • Frank Jotzo, 2009. "Climate Change Economics and Policy in the Asia Pacific," Environmental Economics Research Hub Research Reports 0911, Environmental Economics Research Hub, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
  • Handle: RePEc:een:eenhrr:0911

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Fisher-Vanden, Karen & Jefferson, Gary H. & Liu, Hongmei & Tao, Quan, 2004. "What is driving China's decline in energy intensity?," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(1), pages 77-97, March.
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    1. Burkard Eberlein & Dirk Matten, 2009. "Business Responses to Climate Change Regulation in Canada and Germany: Lessons for MNCs from Emerging Economies," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 86(2), pages 241-255, March.

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