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Disaggregating Electricity Generation Technologies in CGE Models

  • Vipin Arora
  • Yiyong Cai

We illustrate the importance of disaggregating electricity generation when considering responses to environmental policies. We begin by reviewing various approaches to electric sector modelling in Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) models, and then clarify and expand upon the structure and calibration of the “technology bundle” approach. We also simulate the proposed U.S. Clear Power Plan and show how a disaggregate electricity sector can change results. Our simulations indicate that both the ability to switch between generation technologies and the manner of aggregation in electricity production are important for quantifying the economic costs of the plan.

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File URL: https://cama.crawford.anu.edu.au/sites/default/files/publication/cama_crawford_anu_edu_au/2014-07/54_2014_arora_cai.pdf
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Paper provided by Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University in its series CAMA Working Papers with number 2014-54.

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Length: 29 pages
Date of creation: Jul 2014
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:een:camaaa:2014-54
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  1. Katja Schumacher & Ronald D. Sands, 2006. "Where Are the Industrial Technologies in Energy-Economy Models?: An Innovative CGE Approach for Steel Production in Germany," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 605, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  2. Katja Schumacher & Ronald D. Sands, 2005. "Innovative Energy Technologies and Climate Policy in Germany," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 509, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  3. Burfisher,Mary E., 2011. "Introduction to Computable General Equilibrium Models," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521766968.
  4. Toshihiko Masui & Kenichi Matsumoto & Yasuaki Hijioka & Tsuguki Kinoshita & Toru Nozawa & Sawako Ishiwatari & Etsushi Kato & P. Shukla & Yoshiki Yamagata & Mikiko Kainuma, 2011. "An emission pathway for stabilization at 6 Wm −2 radiative forcing," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 109(1), pages 59-76, November.
  5. Johnson, Erik Paul, 2014. "The cost of carbon dioxide abatement from state renewable portfolio standards," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(2), pages 332-350.
  6. Sue Wing, Ian, 2008. "The synthesis of bottom-up and top-down approaches to climate policy modeling: Electric power technology detail in a social accounting framework," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 547-573, March.
  7. McKibbin, Warwick J. & Morris, Adele C. & Wilcoxen, Peter J., 2014. "Pricing carbon in the U.S.: A model-based analysis of power-sector-only approaches," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(1), pages 130-150.
  8. Burfisher,Mary E., 2011. "Introduction to Computable General Equilibrium Models," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521139779.
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