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Is Global Equality the Enemy of National Equality?

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  • Rodrik, Dani

    (University of Chicago)

Abstract

The bulk of global inequality is accounted for by income differences across countries rather than within countries. Expanding trade with China has aggravated inequality in some advanced economies, while ameliorating global inequality. But the "China shock" is receding and other low-income countries are unlikely to replicate China's export-oriented industrialization experience. Relaxing restrictions on cross-border labor mobility might have an even stronger positive effect on global inequality. However it also raises a similar tension. While there would likely be adverse effects on low-skill workers in the advanced economies, international labor mobility has some advantages compared to further liberalizing international trade in goods. I argue that none of the contending perspectives--national-egalitarian, cosmopolitan, utilitarian--rovides on its own an adequate frame for evaluating the consequences.

Suggested Citation

  • Rodrik, Dani, 2017. "Is Global Equality the Enemy of National Equality?," Working Paper Series rwp17-003, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecl:harjfk:rwp17-003
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    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Is Global Equality the Enemy of National Equality?
      by maximorossi in NEP-LTV blog on 2017-06-02 17:26:07
    2. Is Global Equality the Enemy of National Equality?
      by maximorossi in NEP-LTV blog on 2017-03-22 00:57:23

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    Cited by:

    1. Aksoy, Ozan, 2019. "Social identity and social value orientations," SocArXiv 83rzv, Center for Open Science.
    2. Ravallion, Martin, 2019. "Global inequality when unequal countries create unequal people," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 111(C), pages 85-97.
    3. Andrea Brandolini & John Micklewright, 2020. "Tony Atkinson’s new book, Measuring Poverty Around the World. Some further reflections," Working Papers 518, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.

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