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The implications of global and domestic credit cycles for emerging market economies: measures of finance-adjusted output gaps

Author

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  • Grintzalis, Ioannis
  • Lodge, David
  • Manu, Ana-Simona

Abstract

We present estimates of finance-adjusted output gaps which incorporate the information on the domestic and global credit cycles for a sample of emerging market economies (EMEs). Following recent BIS research, we use a state-space representation of an HP filter augmented with a measure of the credit gap to estimate finance-adjusted output gaps. We measure the domestic and global credit gaps as the deviation of private-sector real credit growth and net capital flows to EMEs from long-term trends, using the asymmetric Band-Pass filter. Overall, we find that financial cycle information is associated with cyclical movements in output. In the current circumstances, the estimates suggest that if financing and credit conditions were to tighten, it would be associated with a moderation in activity in some EMEs. JEL Classification: C32, E32, F32

Suggested Citation

  • Grintzalis, Ioannis & Lodge, David & Manu, Ana-Simona, 2017. "The implications of global and domestic credit cycles for emerging market economies: measures of finance-adjusted output gaps," Working Paper Series 2034, European Central Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecb:ecbwps:20172034
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. repec:bdr:ensayo:v:35:y:2017:i:82:p:40-52 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Amat Adarov, 2017. "Financial Cycles in Credit, Housing and Capital Markets: Evidence from Systemic Economies," wiiw Working Papers 140, The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies, wiiw.
    3. Enrique Alberola & Rocio Gondo & Marco Lombardi & Diego Urbina, 2017. "Output gaps and stabilisation policies in Latin America: The effect of commodity and capital flow cycles," ENSAYOS SOBRE POLÍTICA ECONÓMICA, BANCO DE LA REPÚBLICA - ESPE, vol. 35(82), pages 40-52, April.
    4. R. Barrell & D. Karim & Corrado Macchiarelli, 2017. "Towards an understanding of credit cycles: do all credit booms cause crises?," Working Paper series 17-28, Rimini Centre for Economic Analysis.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Domestic credit cycle; global financial cycle; output gap;

    JEL classification:

    • C32 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes; State Space Models
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • F32 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Current Account Adjustment; Short-term Capital Movements

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