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Sometimes it helps: the evolving predictive power of spreads on GDP dynamics

  • Nicoletti, Giulio
  • Passaro, Raffaele
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    We investigate the predictive content of credit and government interest spreads with respect to the Italian GDP growth. Our analysis with Dynamic Model Averaging identifies when interest spreads were more useful predictors of economic activity: these periods are not limited to the Great Recession. For credit spreads we gather information from both bank loans and corporate bonds and we compare their predictive role over time and over different forecasting horizons. JEL Classification: C52, E37

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    Paper provided by European Central Bank in its series Working Paper Series with number 1447.

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    Date of creation: Jul 2012
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    Handle: RePEc:ecb:ecbwps:20121447
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    1. Antonello D'Agostino & Luca Gambetti & Domenico Giannone, 2009. "Macroeconomic Forecasting and Structural Change," Working Papers ECARES 2009_020, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    2. Espinoza, Raphael & Fornari, Fabio & Lombardi, Marco J., 2009. "The role of financial variables in predicting economic activity," Working Paper Series 1108, European Central Bank.
    3. Peter R. Hansen & Asger Lunde & James M. Nason, 2011. "The Model Confidence Set," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 79(2), pages 453-497, 03.
    4. Massimiliano Marcellino & James Stock & Mark Watson, 2005. "A Comparison of Direct and Iterated Multistep AR Methods for Forecasting Macroeconomic Time Series," Working Papers 285, IGIER (Innocenzo Gasparini Institute for Economic Research), Bocconi University.
    5. Forni, Mario & Hallin, Marc & Lippi, Marco & Reichlin, Lucrezia, 2002. "Do Financial Variables Help Forecasting Inflation and Real Activity in the Euro Area?," CEPR Discussion Papers 3146, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    6. Bai, Jushan & Ng, Serena, 2008. "Forecasting economic time series using targeted predictors," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 146(2), pages 304-317, October.
    7. Simon Gilchrist & Vladimir Yankov & Egon Zakrajsek, 2009. "Credit Market Shocks and Economic Fluctuations: Evidence from Corporate Bond and Stock Markets," NBER Working Papers 14863, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Gary Koop & Dimitris Korobilis, 2011. "Forecasting Inflation Using Dynamic Model Averaging," Working Papers 1119, University of Strathclyde Business School, Department of Economics.
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