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Macroeconomic forecasting and structural change

Author

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  • Giannone, Domenico
  • D'Agostino, Antonello
  • Gambetti, Luca

Abstract

The aim of this paper is to assess whether explicitly modeling structural change increases the accuracy of macroeconomic forecasts. We produce real time out-of-sample forecasts for inflation, the unemployment rate and the interest rate using a Time-Varying Coefficients VAR with Stochastic Volatility (TV-VAR) for the US. The model generates accurate predictions for the three variables. In particular for inflation the TV-VAR outperforms, in terms of mean square forecast error, all the competing models: fixed coefficients VARs, Time-Varying ARs and the na JEL Classification: C32, E37, E47

Suggested Citation

  • Giannone, Domenico & D'Agostino, Antonello & Gambetti, Luca, 2010. "Macroeconomic forecasting and structural change," Working Paper Series 1167, European Central Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecb:ecbwps:20101167
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    forecasting; inflation; stochastic volatility; time varying vector autoregression;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C32 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes; State Space Models
    • E37 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Forecasting and Simulation: Models and Applications
    • E47 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Forecasting and Simulation: Models and Applications

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