IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Log in (now much improved!) to save this paper

The Rise and Fall of Unions in the United States

Union membership displayed an inverted-U-shaped pattern over the 20th century, while the distribution of income sketched a U. A model of unions is developed to analyze these phenomena. There is a distribution of firms in economy. Firms hire capital, plus skilled and unskilled labor. Unionization is a costly process. A union decides how many firms to organize and its members' wage rate. Simulation of the developed model establishes that skilled-biased technological change, which affects the productivity of skilled labor relative to unskilled labor, can potentially explain the observed paths for union membership and income inequality. Journal of Monetary Economics, 2016

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: http://www.jeremygreenwood.net/papers/risefall.pdf
File Function: full text
Download Restriction: None

Paper provided by Economie d'Avant Garde in its series Economie d'Avant Garde Research Reports with number 19.

as
in new window

Length:
Date of creation: Feb 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:eag:rereps:19
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.jeremygreenwood.net/EAG.htm

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. MacDonald, Glenn M & Robinson, Chris, 1992. "Unionism in a Competitive Industry," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 10(1), pages 33-54, January.
  2. Samuel E. Henly & Juan M. Sanchez, 2009. "The U.S. establishment-size distribution: secular changes and sectoral decomposition," Economic Quarterly, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, issue Fall, pages 419-454.
  3. Jason G. Cummins & Giovanni L. Violante, 2002. "Investment-specific technical change in the US (1947-2000): measurement and macroeconomics consequences," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2002-10, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  4. Leo Wolman, 1937. "Union Membership in Great Britain and the United States," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number wolm37-1, September.
  5. Greenwood, Jeremy & Hercowitz, Zvi & Krusell, Per, 1997. "Long-Run Implications of Investment-Specific Technological Change," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 87(3), pages 342-62, June.
  6. Leo Wolman, 1937. "Union Membership in Great Britain and the United States," NBER Chapters, in: Union Membership in Great Britain and the United States, pages 1-16 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Barry T. Hirsch & David A. Macpherson, 1993. "Union Membership and Coverage Files from the Current Population Surveys: Note," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 46(3), pages 574-578, April.
  8. Karel Williams & Colin Haslam & John Williams, 1992. "Ford versus `Fordism': The Beginning of Mass Production?," Work, Employment & Society, British Sociological Association, vol. 6(4), pages 517-555, December.
  9. Per Krusell & Lee E. Ohanian & JosÈ-Victor RÌos-Rull & Giovanni L. Violante, 2000. "Capital-Skill Complementarity and Inequality: A Macroeconomic Analysis," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 68(5), pages 1029-1054, September.
  10. Leo Wolman, 1937. "Union Membership in Great Britain and the United States," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number unkn73-4, September.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eag:rereps:19. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Jeremy Greenwood)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.