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Unionism in a Competitive Industry


  • MacDonald, Glenn M
  • Robinson, Chris


This article explores a model in which a union confronts many competitive workers, firms, and consumers. Under "monopoly" unionism, union coverage may be incomplete; then, union wages and employment are insensitive to product demand variation. Under "efficient" unionism, coverage can never be incomplete; some union variables necessarily vary with product demand. Preliminary evidence on the demand independence under the incomplete coverage hypothesis is presented. Also, more structure is imposed and further hypotheses are derived, and the manner in which the model can be enriched to allow for a variety of union-related issues within a consistent framework is set out. Copyright 1992 by University of Chicago Press.

Suggested Citation

  • MacDonald, Glenn M & Robinson, Chris, 1992. "Unionism in a Competitive Industry," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 10(1), pages 33-54, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:jlabec:v:10:y:1992:i:1:p:33-54

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Card, David & Krueger, Alan B, 1992. "Does School Quality Matter? Returns to Education and the Characteristics of Public Schools in the United States," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 100(1), pages 1-40, February.
    2. Dee, Thomas S., 1999. "The complementarity of teen smoking and drinking," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(6), pages 769-793, December.
    3. Robert Haveman & Barbara Wolfe, 1995. "The Determinants of Children's Attainments: A Review of Methods and Findings," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 33(4), pages 1829-1878, December.
    4. Michael Grossman & Frank J. Chaloupka & Henry Saffer & Adit Laixuthai, 1993. "Effects of Alcohol Price Policy on Youth," NBER Working Papers 4385, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Beverly Duncan, 1965. "Dropouts and the Unemployed," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 73, pages 121-121.
    6. Michael Grossman, 1993. "Policy Watch: Alcohol and Cigarette Taxes," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 7(4), pages 211-222, Fall.
    7. Meyer, Bruce D, 1995. "Natural and Quasi-experiments in Economics," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 13(2), pages 151-161, April.
    8. Hanushek, Eric A, 1986. "The Economics of Schooling: Production and Efficiency in Public Schools," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 24(3), pages 1141-1177, September.
    9. Cook, Philip J. & Moore, Michael J., 1993. "Drinking and schooling," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 12(4), pages 411-429, December.
    10. Chesson, Harrell & Harrison, Paul & Kassler, William J, 2000. "Sex Under the Influence: The Effect of Alcohol Policy on Sexually Transmitted Disease Rates in the United States," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 43(1), pages 215-238, April.
    11. Coate, Douglas & Grossman, Michael, 1988. "Effects of Alcoholic Beverage Prices and Legal Drinking Ages on Youth Alcohol Use," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 31(1), pages 145-171, April.
    12. Thomas S. Dee & William N. Evans, 1997. "Teen Drinking and Education Attainment: Evidence From Two-Sample Instrumental Variables (TSIV) Estimates," NBER Working Papers 6082, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    Cited by:

    1. Emin Dinlersoz & Jeremy Greenwood & Henry Hyatt, 2014. "Who do Unions Target? Unionization over the Life-Cycle of U.S. Businesses," NBER Working Papers 20151, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Jeremy Greenwood, 2011. "The Up and Down of Unions," 2011 Meeting Papers 1, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    3. Dinlersoz, Emin & Greenwood, Jeremy, 2016. "The rise and fall of unions in the United States," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 83(C), pages 129-146.
    4. Emin M. Dinlersoz & Jeremy Greenwood, 2012. "The Rise and Fall of Unions in the U.S," NBER Working Papers 18079, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. repec:cen:wpaper:14-09 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. repec:cen:wpaper:12-12 is not listed on IDEAS

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