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Item Pricing Laws, Supplier Behavior, and the Diffusion of Time-Saving Technology Innovations

Author

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  • James G. Mulligan

    () (Department of Economics,University of Delaware)

  • Nilotpal Das

Abstract

In this paper we provide non-parametric and parametric estimations of the initial diffusion process of point-of-sale optical scanners that illustrate the importance of controlling for supplier behavior and government regulations. In particular, we show that discrete changes in the early development of the technology followed predictably different diffusion paths depending on each vintage’s relative effect on service speed and costs of production. We also provide evidence that item-pricing laws passed in six states as consumer protection initiatives slowed down the initial diffusion of the technology at the same time as consumer acceptance of scanners was growing nation-wide.

Suggested Citation

  • James G. Mulligan & Nilotpal Das, 2006. "Item Pricing Laws, Supplier Behavior, and the Diffusion of Time-Saving Technology Innovations," Working Papers 06-11, University of Delaware, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:dlw:wpaper:06-11
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • O3 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights
    • L8 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Services

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