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Vintage Effects and the Diffusion of Time-Saving Technological Innovations: The Adoption of Optical Scanners by U.S. Supermarkets."

Author

Listed:
  • James G. Mulligan

    () (Department of Economics,University of Delaware)

  • Nilotpal Das

    ()

Abstract

The diffusion literature implicitly assumes that a technological innovation remains homogeneous throughout the time period of the study with the sole modification being an assumed reduction in the real price of the technology over time. We argue that the technology can change in significant ways from one vintage to another to alter the nature of the diffusion process. We support this claim with estimates from non-parametric, semi-parametric and parametric duration models for the first generation of optical scanners installed in supermarkets in the U.S. between June 1974 and March 1985.

Suggested Citation

  • James G. Mulligan & Nilotpal Das, 2004. "Vintage Effects and the Diffusion of Time-Saving Technological Innovations: The Adoption of Optical Scanners by U.S. Supermarkets."," Working Papers 04-06, University of Delaware, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:dlw:wpaper:04-06
    as

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    File URL: http://graduate.lerner.udel.edu/sites/default/files/ECON/PDFs/RePEc/dlw/WorkingPapers/2004/UDWP2004-06.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    6. Jennifer F. Reinganum, 1983. "Technology Adoption Under Imperfect Information," Bell Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 14(1), pages 57-69, Spring.
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    13. Levin, Sharon G & Levin, Stanford L & Meisel, John B, 1987. "A Dynamic Analysis of the Adoption of a New Technology: The Case of Optical Scanners," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 69(1), pages 12-17, February.
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    15. Hannan, Timothy H & McDowell, John M, 1987. "Rival Precedence and the Dynamics of Technology Adoption: An Empirical Analysis," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 54(214), pages 155-171, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Jonathan Beck & Michal Grajek & Christian Wey, 2005. "Hypermarket Competition and the Diffusion of Retail Checkout Barcode Scanning," CIG Working Papers SP II 2005-19, Wissenschaftszentrum Berlin (WZB), Research Unit: Competition and Innovation (CIG).
    2. Emek Basker, 2012. "Raising the Barcode Scanner: Technology and Productivity in the Retail Sector," NBER Chapters,in: Standards, Patents and Innovations National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Emek Basker & Tim Simcoe, 2017. "Upstream, Downstream: Diffusion and Impacts of the Universal Product Code," Working Papers 17-66, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
    4. James G. Mulligan & Nilotpal Das, 2005. "Persistent Adoption of Time-Saving Process Innovations," Working Papers 05-03, University of Delaware, Department of Economics.
    5. Emek Basker, 2015. "Change at the Checkout: Tracing the Impact of a Process Innovation," Journal of Industrial Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 63(2), pages 339-370, June.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Technological change;

    JEL classification:

    • O3 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights
    • L8 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Services

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