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The Financial Accelerator, Wages, and Optimal Monetary Policy

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  • Tobias König

Abstract

This paper studies the effects of labor market outcomes on firms’ loan demand and on credit intermediation. In a first step, I investigate how wages in the production sector affect bank net worth and the process of financial intermediation in partial equilibrium. Second, the role of the identified channels are studied in general equilibrium using a new- Keynesian DSGE-model with financial frictions and an endogenous financial accelerator mechanism. Third, I investigate how perfect and imperfect labor markets, in a setting with interactions between production factor costs and the intermediation of credit, affect the transmission mechanism of monetary policy. The analysis reveals that financial frictions reduce the factor demand elasticity of capital to a change in wages. This finding is relevant for the determination of optimal monetary policy, both for financial shocks and supply shocks inflation stabilization imposes high welfare costs. At the same time, stabilizing nominal wages becomes welfare beneficial by reducing both the volatility of the credit spread and the output gap.

Suggested Citation

  • Tobias König, 2020. "The Financial Accelerator, Wages, and Optimal Monetary Policy," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1860, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:diw:diwwpp:dp1860
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Hansen, James, 2018. "Optimal monetary policy with capital and a financial accelerator," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 92(C), pages 84-102.
    2. Demirel Ufuk D, 2009. "Optimal Monetary Policy in a Financially Fragile Economy," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 9(1), pages 1-37, May.
    3. Oliver de Groot & Alexander Haas, 2019. "The Signalling Channel of Negative Interest Rates," Working Papers 201905, University of Liverpool, Department of Economics.
    4. Gertler, Mark & Karadi, Peter, 2011. "A model of unconventional monetary policy," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 58(1), pages 17-34, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Khalid ElFayoumi, 2020. "Firm Financing and the Relative Demand for Labor and Capital," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1908, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Financial accelerator; monetary policy; nominal rigidities; factor costs;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies

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